Category Archives: Uncategorized

RADIO CITY ROCKETTES CHRISTMAS SHOWS CANCELED DUE TO COVID OUTBREAK—‘HAMILTON’ CANCELED ·

(Luke Funk’s article appeared on Fox5 New York.)

NEW YORK – The Radio City Rockettes are canceling their entire 2021 season due to COVID-19 cases.

“We regret that we are unable to continue the Christmas Spectacular this season due to increasing challenges from the pandemic,” the Rockettes posted on Twitter. 

The show had canceled Friday show due to breakthrough COVID-19 cases among members of the production moments before the 11 a.m. performance.  At least some of the cases appeared to be among members of the orchestra.

The annual show features the Rockettes and is a holiday tradition in the city.  People were already in their seats when they were told the show was canceled.  Children and adults were seen crying outside the Midtown Manhattan venue after realizing they were not going to get to see the show.

NY SETS RECORD FOR SINGLE-DAY CASES

Many in the crowd were tourists who had traveled to New York City to see the show.

(Read more)

TONIGHT’S PERFORMANCE OF TINA – THE TINA TURNER MUSICAL CANCELED DUE TO POSITIVE COVID TESTS RESULTS IN THE COMPANY ·

(Chloe Rabinowitz’s article appeared in the NY Post, 12/16.)

Performances are scheduled to resume on Friday, December 17.

Tonight’s performance of TINA – THE Tina Turner MUSICAL (Thursday, December 16 at 7pm) is being canceled due to positive Covid-19 test results within the Broadway company.

Performances are scheduled to resume on Friday, December 17.

Produced by Stage EntertainmentJames L. Nederlander and Tali Pelman, in association with Tina Turner, TINA – THE Tina Turner MUSICAL currently stars Nkeki Obi-Melekwe as Tina, Tony Award nominee Daniel J. Watts as Ike, Kayla Davion as Tina (at some performances), Dawnn Lewis as Zelma, Tony Award nominee Myra Lucretia Taylor as Gran Georgeanna and Jessica Rush as Rhonda. TINA – THE Tina Turner MUSICAL also features Juliet BennSteven BoothNick Rashad BurroughsGerald CaesarJulius ChaseAyla Ciccone-BurtonHolli’ ConwayLeandra Ellis-GastonCharlie FranklinJudith FranklinJosiah GaffneyMatthew GriffinAri GrooverSheldon HenryDavid JenningsRoss LekitesRobert LenziRob MarnellJhardon DiShon Milton, NaTonia Monét, Phierce PhoenixJustin SchumanAllysa ShorteEric SiegleCarla R. StewartSkye Dakota Turner, Eric A. Walker Jr., Katie Webber and Michelle West.

Written by Tony Award nominee and Pulitzer Prize winner Katori Hall with Frank Ketelaar and Kees Prins, TINA – THE Tina Turner MUSICAL is directed by Tony Award nominee Phyllida Lloyd with choreography by Tony Award nominee Anthony Van Laast, set and costume designs by Tony Award nominee Mark Thompson, musical supervision, additional music and arrangements by Nicholas Skilbeck, lighting by Tony Award nominee Bruno Poet, sound by Tony Award nominee Nevin Steinberg, projection design by Tony Award nominee Jeff Sugg, orchestrations by Tony Award nominee Ethan Popp, wigs, hair and makeup design by Drama Desk Award winner Campbell Young Associates, music direction by Alvin Hough Jr. and casting by The Telsey Office.

(Read more)

 

MARÍA IRENE FORNÉS: THE PUBLIC THEATER’S UNDER THE RADAR FESTIVAL MABOU MINES & WEATHERVANE PRODUCTIONS –‘MUD’/’DROWNING'(JAN 12-30) ·

FORNÉS  RETURNS TO MABOU MINES FOR UNDER THE RADAR  
THE PUBLIC THEATER’S UNDER THE RADAR FESTIVAL
MABOU MINES & WEATHERVANE PRODUCTIONS 
PRESENT
MUD/DROWNING
WRITTEN BY
MARÍA IRENE FORNÉS
DIRECTED BY
JOANNE AKALAITIS
WITH NEW MUSIC COMPOSED BY
PHILIP GLASS
PERFORMANCES
January 12-30, 2022
Tuesday – Saturday at 7:30 pm
Sunday at 5pm

MABOU MINES
150 First Ave. Second Floor, NYC 10009

Tickets, now on sale, are $25 and available through The Public Theater.
TICKETS

Mabou Mines’ and Weathervane Productions’ unique celebration of the legendary, late playwright and director María Irene Fornés—a pairing of Philip Glass’ transformation of her five-page play Drowning into an opera and a version of her acclaimed play Mud, both directed by Mabou Mines co-founder JoAnne Akalaitis —returns as part of The Public Theater’s Under the Radar Festival. These intimate productions, both with new music composed by Glass, were first presented at Mabou Mines in February, 2020.

For both works, Akalaitis and her collaborators have developed an aesthetic and philosophical framework to honor the homemade quality of many of Fornés’ own stagings—a “production style that understood just how profound stillness, sparseness, and playful humor could be” (Los Angeles Times).  Akalaitis describes these works as “a conversation between the actors, design, the music, the singers, and of course the primary conversationalist in all this is Irene. They are seemingly stylistically very different—with the quotidian atmosphere and language of Mud and the monstrosity of the characters and opaqueness of the poetry in Drowning—but the heartbeat of both these pieces is in the same body.”

DONATE

SUPPORT FOR MABOU MINES is provided by the National Endowment for the Arts, The New York State Council on the Arts, the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in Partnership with the City Council and Materials for the Arts, The NYC Women’s Fund by the City of New York Mayor’s Office of Media and Entertainment/The New York Foundation for the Arts, the Axe-Houghton Foundation, Foundation for Contemporary Arts, Howard Gilman Foundation JKW Foundation, The NYC COVID-19 Response and Impact Fund in The New York Community Trust, Emma A. Shaefer Charitable Trust, Shubert Foundation, the Tides Foundation and the W Trust.ation, the W Trust and Emma A. Shaefer Charitable Trust.

Facebook
Instagram
Website
Twitter

BROADWAY’S “ALADDIN” SHUTS AFTER ONLY ONE PERFORMANCE SINCE “RE-OPENING NIGHT” DUE TO BREAKTHROUGH COVID CASESNNAN ·

(This story is from CBSNewYork.com, 9/30.)

Just two weeks after celebrating the return of Broadway, one of the most anticipated shows has been shut down.

Wednesday night’s performance of “Aladdin” was canceled after there were positive COVID tests within the cast and crew.

“Aladdin” made its triumphant return Tuesday night, even tweeting video of its curtain call 18 months in the making, adding #BroadwayIsBack.

But who knew it would be curtains for the show in just 24 hours due to breakthrough cases in the company?

“We were disappointed. We drove in, and we listened to the soundtrack on the way in,” Meredith Picone told CBS New York.

Picone brought her 8-year-old son, Tyler, from Stony Brook, Long Island, to see the show, only to be shown the stage door.

“We were shocked and stunned, but we were disappointed,” she said.

It was a longer trip for a group that came from Pontiac, Michigan.

Asked whether it was disappointing, Cecelia Wilson replied, “Yes, it was … because I’m really a kid at heart.”

“That’s why I wanted to come, to see this,” Madison Lee said.

With dozens of new shows upcoming, it raises concerns about whether other shows could also be put in COVID jeopardy.

“Broadway has a way, especially even in the films of Disney, they found a way to connect to every generation. … If it does affect any other Broadway musical, ‘Harry Potter,’ ‘Dear Evan Hansen,’ it would be a real shock,” Upper West Side resident Brian Snipes said.

For now, “Aladdin” lovers will have to wait for the re-reopening, whenever that is.

Customers will get a full refund for their tickets. It’s unclear when performances will resume.

(Read more)

CANADA: CURTAINS REOPEN ON SHAW AND STRATFORD FESTIVALS WITH OUTDOOR PRODUCTIONS OF ‘THE DEVIL’S DISCIPLE’ AND ‘A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S DREAM’ ·

(Karen Finker’s article appeared in The Toronto Star, 7/24, 26; Photo: Toronto Star.)

If you’re wondering where all the pink petunias in Ontario are, head to Stratford. The city’s flowerpots are exploding with them. Driving into the city down Ontario Street, they line the way like a ceremonial approach, their cheeriness the first sign of the amazing welcome that awaits those fortunate enough to score a ticket to a Stratford Festival production this season.

I am one of those lucky few: this week, I attended the opening performance of Stratford’s first play of the season — fittingly, one by Shakespeare, “A Midsummer Night’s Dream.” The next day I made my way to Niagara-on-the-Lake for the Shaw Festival’s opening weekend, and again, the approach was festive: groups of cyclists on slightly wobbly routes between brewpubs and wineries, Queen’s Parade heaving with tourists, and the Festival Theatre shining at the end of the route. There I took in Shaw’s first play of the season, fittingly one by George Bernard Shaw himself, “The Devil’s Disciple.”

What’s it like to be back, watching live theatre after a 16-month hiatus? It’s joyful, it’s satisfying, it’s heartbreaking, it’s familiar and unfamiliar at the same time. As a professional theatregoer I’ve watched thousands of productions; at peak times four or five a week. In the before-times, taking a seat in a theatre was my bread and butter. Right now, it’s a hothouse activity, managed with loving care by staff and volunteers whose numbers seem to rival those of audience members themselves. Both Stratford and Shaw are currently working to increase the capacity of their theatres given that Ontario’s Reopening Step 3 allows for larger audiences: 75 per cent capacity outdoors, but only 50 per cent capacity indoors. For the moment shows are still limited to up to 100 spectators outdoors, and even fewer indoors, based on previous protocols. What’s always been an élite pursuit — seeing theatre in these destination venues — therefore feels more privileged than ever.

Both festivals chose to stage these opening shows outside under canopies. All of Stratford’s season will be outdoors with the exception of one show (“Three Tall Women” at the Studio Theatre). Shaw’s is a mix of indoors and outdoors. This is not usual practice for these theatres — it is, of course the way they did it in Shakespeare’s day — and however much this may be causing complications for the companies, particularly given the unstable weather we’ve been experiencing, I absolutely loved seeing these shows under these conditions. It feels safe; it feels great to be engaging with culture outside after a year-plus stuck indoors with my screens; and it underlines that theatre is deeply engaged with the world we live in.

(Read more)

PHYLLIS WHEELER SHINES A LIGHT ON HER TEEN NOVEL: ‘THE LONG SHADOW,’ FROM ELK LAKE PUBLISHING, INC. (INTERVIEW) ·

In her second interview for Stage Voices, Phyllis Wheeler talks race in America, during three different time periods; stranger danger and comfort zones; and walking a mile–in someone else’s shoes.

Author Phyllis Wheeler tells stories that encourage us to step outside our comfort zones. She’s done it—she and her husband spent twenty years raising their family in a black neighborhood in segregated St. Louis. She’s been a journalist, an engineer, and a homeschooling mom. Now she’s thrilled to be following her dream of becoming an author for young people. Find out more and get a free short story at phylliswheeler.com .

View The Long Shadow on Amazon

Visit Elk Lake Publishing, Inc.  

 

Photo by Arpit Mehta

Without giving too much away, tell us about your novel.

The Long Shadow is a racial reconciliation novel featuring time travel. Fourteen-year-old Richie, from white suburbia, thinks it is a good idea to run away from his guardian – until he finds himself whisked back 50 years, fighting to survive a freak storm, afraid to accept help from a black man.

As Morris mentors him in woodsman skills, a friendship develops. Richie wants to repay his life-debt to Morris and embarks on another trip in time, to 1923 in Missouri.  Can he prevent the lynching of Morris’s grandfather?

Why do you think The Long Shadow stands out in the youth market?

First of all, it’s on the topic of our times, racial reconciliation. Many people want to know more. Secondly, it faces a hitherto-taboo topic head-on. That topic is lynching. Our nation’s sad history of lynching and terrorism against Black people has been ignored or avoided in the past, but it’s high time we pulled it out and dealt with it, in my opinion. Thirdly, the book carries an emotional punch that’s unusual in middle grade fiction.

What seems to be important in writing for young readers (ages 10-14)?

  • Young people find role models when they read, so it’s important to have characters in your story readers want to emulate.
  • Personally I think a happy or mostly happy ending is important. Who wants to read a book and get depressed by it?
  • Beyond that, kids are looking for the same story elements as everyone else: relatable characters, strong plots that keep moving, a satisfying resolution.

All ages might notice your ability with structuring the novel, which takes place in three different times.  Why did you think you could make that work–and, for writers, how do you think and work with structure?

I worked with the basic three-act structure for starters, and then added a sub plot that has its own three act structure. I guess I thought I could make it work because I got positive responses from people who read the manuscript.

More details, if you are interested:

There’s a story setup in Act 1, present day. At the beginning of Act 2, Richie embarks on a journey to find independence, running off to the woods.  Richie eventually realizes he has been sent back fifty years somehow. Act 2 contains various setbacks and consequences as Richie, in the woods in 1969, interacts with a person of a different race, Morris, whom he fears. They begin to build a friendship.  Richie urges Morris to return to his family in town, but Morris has fears related to his grandfather’s lynching. And now the sub plot: Richie takes off for 1923 to try to prevent the lynching. That story contains three acts as well. After that sub plot finishes, we return to the main story, coming to resolution in 1969 and then the present day.

What kinds of research did the book involve?

I set the present-day sequences in Webster Groves, Missouri, the St. Louis suburb where I live, so researching that was easy. The 1969 sequences were mostly set in a wooded area of my state where my husband and I have spent a lot of time, near Farmington, Missouri.  And, in 1969, I was 17 years old. I remember it so clearly. So the part I had to research was 1923 in Columbia, Missouri. I dramatized an actual lynching, that of James T. Scott. This took several days of research in libraries in Columbia.

Now, Columbia happens to be the home of a big university: Mizzou, the University of Missouri.  This had two beneficial effects for me:

  • Grad students over the years analyzed the town history, including Jason Jindrich in 2002 researching how Black people lived in Columbia in the 1920s.
  • Mizzou journalism school student journalist Charles Nutter was present at the mob scene and wrote extensive eyewitness reports.

If the lynching had been in a different town, I wouldn’t have had these resources. I chose that lynching to base my story on not because of that, though. It was simply the most recent one in Missouri on record at the time I checked, and I needed a recent one in order to make the time line work.

The Long Shadow has characters of different races.  As a white writer, what are the traps and issues you faced not being limited by only working with your own race? 

Because I’ve had so many Black friends and neighbors, I think I can walk a mile in their shoes, but I really can’t, I have discovered. I learned to lean heavily on feedback from Black people who read my work. They point out where I am off, and I tear things up if needed and fix it. It’s a humbling experience.

As a homeschooling parent, in the past, what kinds of learning materials did you look for–and how would you envision The Long Shadow being used in homeschooling and schools?

When homeschooling, I looked for materials that I could hand my students and they could do on their own. So I am working on a homeschool “unit study” of at least 20 pages that will serve as a literature study, covering some Missouri history and geography, learning to write haiku, and more. I’m going to put it up on my website at PhyllisWheeler.com/the-long-shadow .

For regular schools, I also have some free classroom discussion questions available. This book should generate some deep discussions on the topic of racism.

What is racism? In my mind, it comes from fear. We are all wired for stranger danger. So we all need to be aware of the negative aspects of that and be willing to reach out, reach beyond our comfort zones.

What did you find yourself learning, as you wrote? 

I learned a lot about the sordid history of the treatment of Black people in Missouri. I was shocked to discover that after emancipation their settlements were sometimes relegated to edges of creeks, which flooded, and without proper sewers, so the water was contaminated.  This happened both in Columbia and in the St. Louis suburb where I live. Even in the nicer Black neighborhoods, there was no paving or street lights.

I also did some introspection about my feelings on the subject of race and racism. That was an eye opener too.

Because of its setting, are you finding Missouri is becoming key to your sales?  To what extent do you think this is a national or international book and why?

Local Missourians seem very interested in a racial reconciliation book, and it’s selling well here. But it’s also doing well online. I believe the book speaks to anyone who has experienced a segregated environment. That’s a lot of people! It’s not just a kids’ book. I am finding that adults are reading the book and recommending it to each other. The reconciliation theme can speak into our divided culture.

How do you think your personal experience prepared you to write this novel?

I lived as a child in Jim Crow Mississippi. There were laws about segregation. There were whites-only bathrooms and water fountains. The schools were separate. The only time I saw Black people was in a store—and in my home. My mother hired a maid to clean our house once a week. The maid lived in a row of shacks just a stone’s throw from our middle class house in a subdivision. Those shacks must have had no plumbing and just some kind of stove for heat. They were primitive. The contrast was so great in my young eyes.

As I grew up I lived in many places. In St. Louis I got married, and we decided to raise our family in a Black neighborhood. We had some wonderful, welcoming neighbors who showed us the warm heart of the Black community, which most white people in St. Louis never see.

View The Long Shadow on Amazon

More about The Long Shadow:

Part survival story, part exploration of racial justice in America, part journey of self-discovery, and wholly engaging and memorable. A well done and powerful story. It is certainly stuck in my head.—Joe Corbett, school librarian, St. Louis

I loved this book. I could not stop reading it once I had begun. It is a delightful story, as well as a very painful one, told very well without a wasted word. I gladly recommend it to anyone. —Jerram Barrs, professor at Covenant Theological Seminary and author of Echoes of Eden: Reflections on Christianity, Literature, and the Arts

I’ve read this book and enjoyed the characters in the story. I like the friendship that blossomed in the story and how the story came full circle in the end. It was a good history lesson without being offensive to anyone.—LaShaunda Hoffman, sensitivity reader and author

Searching for a new favorite book? Look no further than The Long Shadow by Phyllis Wheeler. Richie grabs your attention and doesn’t let go until the very end.—Elsie G, age 13.

Aunt Trudy never wanted kids. Now that she’s Richie’s guardian, she makes his life miserable. Richie just wants to escape, so he seeks refuge in the deep Missouri woods he loves so much.

Suddenly it’s not summer, but late fall. How did that happen? Did the trucker who just gave him a ride somehow whisk him back fifty years in time?

The woods aren’t for Richie the haven they used to be. After a freak storm, he finds himself at the mercy of Morris, a mysterious black man who also calls the woods home. Is Morris a savior? Or someone to fear?

 

CONSTANT STANISLAVSKI (120) ·

The words and wisdom of Constantin Stanislavski:

When . . . somebody advised Chekhov to write a play about the [Russo-Japanese] war, the great writer was insulted:

“Listen,” he said, “it is necessary that twenty years should pass. It is impossible to speak of it now. It is necessary that the world should be in repose. Only then can an author be unprejudiced.” (MLIA)

HARMONY RULES IN “IN THE HEIGHTS” ·

(Anthony Lane’s article appeared in The New Yorker, 6/11; PHOTO: Anthony Ramos stars in Jon M. Chu’s film of the Broadway musical.Illustration by Katty Huertas.)

Jon M. Chu’s adaptation of Lin-Manuel Miranda’s Broadway musical presents an uplifting portrait of a Dominican neighborhood in New York where political strife rarely intrudes.

Morning in America, not yet six o’clock, and a couple of working stiffs, in the bright early glare of New York, are finding it hard to make a start. One of them is a crane operator, down at the docks, beside a U.S. Navy vessel. “I feel like I’m not out of bed yet,” he says—or sings, in a baritone as slow as a bear. Way uptown, close to the 181st Street subway stop, someone else has the same problem. “Lights up on Washington Heights, up at the break of day, I wake up, and I got this little punk I gotta chase away,” he says—or raps, in a voice as crisp as an apple. The first man, who is unnamed, initiates “On the Town” (1949), and the second is Usnavi (Anthony Ramos), the likable hero of “In the Heights.” Two guys, two movies, seventy-two years apart, both springing from stage musicals. Oh, and Usnavi is so called because his father, arriving from the Dominican Republic, saw a ship marked “U.S. Navy.” How much is truly new, under the sun?

(Read more)