Category Archives: Events

‘MUD/DROWNING’: PERFORMANCES LIVE NOW ·

MUD/DROWNING

 

 

ONLY 15 CHANCES TO SEE THIS NYT CRITIC’S PICK!
LIMITED AVAILABILITY!
 
GET TICKETS NOW!
MABOU MINES AND WEATHERVANE PRODUCTIONS 
IN ASSOCIATION WITH THE DAYS AND NIGHTS FESTIVAL PRESENT
MUD/DROWNING
WRITTEN BY
MARÍA IRENE FORNÉS

Playwright Maria Irene FornŽs photographed at the Golden Gate Theater building on December 20, 1986.

DIRECTED BY
JOANNE AKALAITIS
WITH NEW MUSIC COMPOSED BY
PHILIP GLASS
 
GET TICKETS NOW!
PERFORMANCES
September 21 – October 9, 2022
Wed – Sat at 7:30 PM
Sun at 2:00 PM
Additional show on Tues Sept 27 at 7:30 PMMABOU MINES
150 First Ave. Second Floor, NYC 10009

TICKETS $25 | NOW ON SALEPLEASE NOTE: Mabou Mines requires masks, a proof of a complete COVID-19 vaccination, and a valid ID to enter the building and attend performances.
 

Mabou Mines and Weathervane Productions, in association with Philip Glass’ The Days and Nights Festival, present a celebration of legendary playwright and director María Irene Fornés, featuring Philip Glass’ transformation of her five-page play Drowning into an opera and Fornés’ acclaimed play, Mud. This exciting double-bill marks the show’s triumphant return after a sold-out run at Mabou Mines in 2020, where its New York premiere was called “a notable new work” and designated a Critic’s Pick by The New York Times. 

JoAnne Akalaitis directs these two intimate productions (both with new music composed by Glass), which offer New York audiences an opportunity to experience the work of a singular writer at close range. Akalaitis explains, “The program is intended to express that world of Irene’s, which is about the terribly poignant and unfulfilled longing for some kind of emotional accomplishment in life that often gets dashed—that’s what both of these pieces are about. We hope this evening offers a glimpse into the range of Irene’s rich theatrical landscape and the heart of an artist who never soothes and continues to astonish.”

Documentary Film Screening from director Michelle Memran

THE REST I MAKE UP

A Film About María Irene Fornés And Her Unexpected Friendship With Filmmaker Michelle Memran.

Monday, October 3, 2022 at 7:30 PM | Mabou Mines Theater

Don’t miss Mabou Mines’ companion event to Mud/Drowning: a free screening of The Rest I Make Up, the 2018 documentary about María Irene Fornés and her unexpected friendship with filmmaker Michelle Memran. The screening will be followed by a talkback with Memran. 

RSVP HERE
DONATE

SUPPORT FOR MABOU MINES is provided by the National Endowment for the Arts, The New York State Council on the Arts, the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in Partnership with the City Council and Materials for the Arts, The NYC Women’s Fund by the City of New York Mayor’s Office of Media and Entertainment/The New York Foundation for the Arts, the Axe-Houghton Foundation, Foundation for Contemporary Arts, Howard Gilman Foundation JKW Foundation, The NYC COVID-19 Response and Impact Fund in The New York Community Trust, Emma A. Shaefer Charitable Trust, Shubert Foundation, the Tides Foundation and the W Trust.ation, the W Trust and Emma A. Shaefer Charitable Trust.

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‘THE PRINCE’ REVIEW – PLAYFUL ROMP THROUGH SHAKESPEAREAN ROLES ·

(Kate Wyver’s article appeared in the Guardian, 9/22; via Pam Green; Photo:  Exploration of transgression … Corey Montague-Sholay (Prince Hal), Joni Ayton-Kent (Sam), Mary Malone (Jen) and Abigail Thorn (Hotspur) in The Prince. Photograph: Tristram Kenton/the Guardian.)

Southwark Playhouse, London
YouTube philosopher Abigail Thorn moves offline and on to the stage with an ambitious exploration of identities and the performance of gender

Using the intelligent wit that makes Abigail Thorn’s YouTube channel so popular, The Prince playfully questions the performance of gender and the roles we are all assigned. Thorn is the host of Philosophy Tube, a channel discussing philosophy in creative, accessible ways. The writer swaps screen for stage in this ambitious if slightly feverish exploration of transgression and transition within Shakespeare’s plays.

The hilarious Jen, played radiantly by Mary Malone, is our comic tether to reality. When it’s revealed that she’s trapped inside a Shakespearean multiverse and is currently wandering around Henry IV Part One – a slightly stodgy but enthusiastic version – her response is to yell “I bloody hate Shakespeare” and attempt to call the police. Her innocence serves as an outstretched hand to the audience, helping us understand the motivations of the characters she’s reluctantly stuck with.

As she searches for an escape route, Jen is drawn to Henry “Hotspur” Percy, the warrior and Prince played with smouldering dignity by Thorn. Recognising Hotspur as trans, at odds with the male role she is playing, Jen begins interrupting the action. This is when the fun really starts, as she encourages the characters to question their written roles, and the matrix starts to crumble. Softer, free-wheeling voices replace the stoic verse, and queer punk aesthetic rips apart the period clothing.

(Read more)

‘PHANTOM OF THE OPERA’ CLOSING NEXT YEAR AFTER HISTORIC RUN ON BROADWAY ·

(from Eyewitness News 7, 9/16; via Drudge Report..)

NEW YORK (WABC) — “Phantom of the Opera,” Broadway’s longest-running show and an icon of New York City theater, will close early next year.

The show announced Friday it will commemorate its 35th anniversary Jan. 26, and then stage its final performance on Broadway on Feb. 18.

Mayor Eric Adams attended the show earlier this month, kicking off Broadway Week with an appearance to celebrate the theater district’s resilience in the wake of the pandemic.

Bottom of Form

Phantom has been the longest-running show in Broadway history for well over a decade.

On Broadway alone, the musical has played more than 13,500 performances to 19.5 million people at The Majestic Theatre on West 44th Street.

(Read more)

***** ‘MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING, REVIEW – HILARIOUS, HEARTFELT SHOW IS EVERYTHING ·

(Nick Ahad’s article appeared in the Guardian, 9/14; Photo: Compelling … Guy Rhys (Benedick) and Daneka Etchells (Beatrice) in Much Ado About Nothing at the Crucible, Sheffield. Photograph: Johan Persson.)

Crucible, Sheffield
Daneka Etchells is the most compelling Beatrice you might ever see in an exceptional production of the romantic comedy

Post lockdown, theatres are looking for sure things and bets don’t come much safer than the wittiest of Shakespeare’s romcoms. Sheffield Theatres and Ramps on the Moon bring this production of Much Ado to the stage just a couple of days after the National Theatre brought down the final curtain on its own. If London audiences missed out, they should head to this exceptional and exceptionally moving version of a bulletproof piece.

A number of aspects elevate the production. One is the involvement of Ramps on the Moon, which aims to normalise the presence of deaf, disabled and neurodiverse people on British stages. Another is the most compelling Beatrice you might ever see: Daneka Etchells plays this script like a maestro, somehow finding new notes in lines that are four centuries old, even making some of it feel like it was written yesterday. When Beatrice’s shield of wit is pierced by heartbreak, Etchells, who is autistic, can’t suppress her – or the character’s – physical tics and watching her resolve to remain calm is deeply affecting.

(Read more)

MARÍA IRENE FORNÉS’ MUD/DROWNING RETURNS TO MABOU MINES, SEPTEMBER 21 – OCTOBER 9 ·

 Fornes returns after a sold-out run at Mabou Mines!
 15 PERFORMANCES ONLY 
 
MABOU MINES AND WEATHERVANE PRODUCTIONS 
IN ASSOCIATION WITH THE DAYS AND NIGHTS FESTIVAL PRESENT
MUD/DROWNING
WRITTEN BY
MARÍA IRENE FORNÉS
DIRECTED BY
JOANNE AKALAITIS
WITH NEW MUSIC COMPOSED BY
PHILIP GLASS
PERFORMANCES
September 21 – October 9, 2022
Wed – Sat at 7:30 PM
Sun at 2:00 PM
Additional show on Tues Sept 27 at 7:30 PM

MABOU MINES
150 First Ave. Second Floor, NYC 10009

TICKETS $25 | NOW ON SALE
 
GET TICKETS
Mabou Mines and Weathervane Productions, in association with Philip Glass’ The Days and Nights Festival, present a celebration of legendary playwright and director María Irene Fornés, featuring Philip Glass’ transformation of her five-page play Drowning into an opera and Fornés’ acclaimed play, Mud. This exciting double-bill marks the show’s triumphant return after a sold-out run at Mabou Mines in 2020, where its New York premiere was called “a notable new work” and designated a Critic’s Pick by The New York Times. 

JoAnne Akalaitis directs these two intimate productions (both with new music composed by Glass), which offer New York audiences an opportunity to experience the work of a singular writer at close range. Akalaitis explains, “The program is intended to express that world of Irene’s, which is about the terribly poignant and unfulfilled longing for some kind of emotional accomplishment in life that often gets dashed—that’s what both of these pieces are about. We hope this evening offers a glimpse into the range of Irene’s rich theatrical landscape and the heart of an artist who never soothes and continues to astonish.”

Documentary Film Screening from director Michelle Memran

THE REST I MAKE UP

A Film About María Irene Fornés And Her Unexpected Friendship With Filmmaker Michelle Memran.

Monday, October 3, 2022 at 7:30 PM | Mabou Mines Theater

Don’t miss Mabou Mines’ companion event to Mud/Drowning: a free screening of The Rest I Make Up, the 2018 documentary about María Irene Fornés and her unexpected friendship with filmmaker Michelle Memran. The screening will be followed by a talkback with Memran. 

RSVP HERE

ROBERT LUPONE, A CHORUS LINE TONY NOMINEE & MCC THEATER FOUNDER, DIES AT 76 ·

(Caitlin Moynihan’s article appeared on Broadway.com. 8/29/22.)

Robert LuPone, founder and artistic director of MCC Theater and Tony-nominated A Chorus Line cast member, died on August 27 following a three-year battle with pancreatic cancer. He was 76.

MCC Theater announced the news in a release saying: “The MCC Theater community mourns the loss of our much loved and uniquely inspiring partner, colleague, and dear friend, Bob LuPone, who lived fearlessly and with great curiosity, good humor, a boundless passion for connection, and a whole lot of heart. We will miss him deeply and always.”

Born in July 1946 in Brooklyn, LuPone attended Adelphi University for two semesters before transferring to Juilliard. He graduated with a BFA in Dance in 1968. LuPone’s first professional job was performing in the ensemble of Westbury Music Fair’s production of The Pajama Game, starring Liza Minnelli, in 1966. He made his Broadway debut in 1968 in Noel Coward’s Sweet Potato. He went on to appear in Minnie’s Boys (1970), The Rothschilds (1970) and The Magic Show (1974). In 1975, LuPone was cast as Al in A Chorus Line, but when another actor departed the production, he stepped into the role of Zach, which lead to a Tony Award nomination when the musical transferred from the Public Theater to Broadway.

(Read more)

 

UNDERGROUND CULTURE: UKRAINE THEATER REOPENS IN BOMBARDED CITY ·

JULIE ANDREWS AND EMMA WALTON HAMILTON TALK ABOUT TAKING THEIR CHILDREN’S BOOK EMPIRE TO THE STAGE ·

(Harry Haun’s article appeared in the Observer, 8/22; via Pam Green.)

‘The Great American Mousical’ — one of the 31 children’s books written by the mother and daughter team — takes it first steps toward a 2023 run in Los Angeles.

Sometime after Victor/Victoria opened on Broadway in 1995, a small, solitary mouse made its way up from the bowels of the Marriott Marquis Theater and into the theater’s wardrobe room. Julie Andrews, then inhabiting both title roles, got the word from her hairdresser, who told her traps were set.

The actress reacted to this news with a combination of horror and compassion that one could expect from somebody who owes her Mary Poppins Oscar to the guy who created Mickey Mouse: “Oh, could you please make sure they put down humane traps? If you catch the little mouse, don’t kill it. Take it out somewhere far away so it can have a life in the country.”

Andrews sheepishly confesses to this response: “The hairdresser looked at me as if I were mad, then said, ‘Julie, the theaters on Broadway are riddled with mice in the basement. There are probably hundreds—perhaps even thousands—of mice under here. This one probably just came up to look at all the stars.’ And that made us laugh. Then, I suddenly had a lightbulb about that notion and started thinking, ‘Oh, my God! A troupe of mice in the basement of a great theater! Wonder if they are putting on their own shows downstairs for their own audiences.’”

She took this idea to her usual collaborator—her daughter Emma Walton Hamilton, who is as theater-savvy as her mother. With husband Stephen Hamilton and producer Sybil Christopher, Hamilton founded the Bay Street Theater in Sag Harbor, New York, 31 years ago and has been running it ever since—all this, while simultaneously writing 31 children’s books with Andrews.

 “The more we talked about it, the more excited we became,” Hamilton admits. “What a way to bring the magic of theater down to a kind of manageable scale for young readers! Within this troupe of mice could be all the classic characters of any theater, whether human or mouse: the director, the difficult leading lady, the intern, the weary producer, the hysterical hairdresser. 

(Read more)

DRUID’S ‘THE LAST RETURN’ BY SONYA KELLY WINS AWARD AT EDINBURGH FRINGE ·

(Deirdre Falvey’s article appeared in the Irish Times, 8/12.)

Fringe First Award for play about conflict, peace and the pursuit of territory at any cost follows rave reviews

Druid theatre company has won a prestigious Scotsman Fringe First Award for its production of The Last Return by Irish writer Sonya Kelly at this year’s Edinburgh Festival Fringe.

Kelly’s sharply written, blisteringly funny play had its world premiere at Galway International Arts Festival last month, where it played to packed, enthusiastic (side-split) houses at Druid’s home, the Mick Lally Theatre. It is currently running at the Traverse Theatre in the heart of Edinburgh, and returns to Ireland to play at Dublin’s Gate Theatre as part of Dublin Theatre Festival in October and November.

Directed by Sara Joyce, The Last Return is a comedy about conflict, peace and the pursuit of territory at any cost. Set in a theatre foyer as five people queue for a ticket to the hottest show in town, it escalates into something more complicated and surreal. Reviewing it in The Irish Times, in July, Sara Keating described how this “shocking and very funny play” with “endless surprises” explored how “the pursuit of a high-quality cultural experience turns political”.

News of the Scotsman Fringe First Award for The Last Return follows rave reviews, including five-star ratings from What’s On Stage, The Arts Desk and The Wee Review, and praise such as “pitch-black comic mayhem” from The Guardian and “wonderful” from The New York Times.

This is Kelly’s second Scotsman Fringe First, previously winning in 2012 for her play The Wheelchair on My Face. Druid has won numerous awards at Edinburgh’s Fringe over the years, including in 1980 for two plays: Island Protected by a Bridge of Glass and The Pursuit of Pleasure (both written by Garry Hynes); in 2007 for The Walworth Farce by Enda Walsh; and in 2008 for another Enda Walsh play, The New Electric Ballroom.

Designed to encourage performers to bring new work to Edinburgh in the spirit of adventure and experiment, the Fringe Firsts are internationally recognised and are the most prestigious theatre awards at the Fringe, this week returning after two years of lockdown.

On Friday morning, after the first week of the festival, the judging team of critics from the Scotsman newspaper announced its first six awards, which also included: Breathless by Laura Horton; And Then The Rodeo Burned Down by Chloe Rice and Natasha Roland; The Beatles Were a Boyband by Rachel O’Regan; Happy Meal by Tabby Lamb; and Masterclass by Feidlim Cannon, Gary Keegan and Adrienne Truscott.

(Read more)