Category Archives: Constant Stanislavski

CONSTANT STANISLAVSKI (123) ·

The words and wisdom of Constantin Stanislavski:

The auditorium was filled by a crowd of simple workingmen and peasants. They listened to what was going on on the stage in the deepest of silences. The serious thoughtful mood . . . prevented them from staging an ordinary theatrical ovation. After the end of the performance the spectators sat for a long time without any movement and departed without any noise, as if they were leaving a temple of worship after prayer. (MLIA)

CONSTANT STANISLAVSKI (122) ·

The words and wisdom of Constantin Stanislavski:

Our art is not eternal, but it is the most inescapable of all arts so far as our contemporaries are concerned. What strength there is in it! Its action is created not by one man, but simultaneously by a group of actors, artists, stage directors, and musicians; not by one art, but simultaneously by many most diverse arts, music, drama, painting, declamation, dancing. This theatrical action is received not by one man, but simultaneously by a crowd of human beings which develops a mass emotion that sharpens the moments of receptivity. (MLIA)

CONSTANT STANISLAVSKI (121) ·

The words and wisdom of Constantin Stanislavski:

It remains unknown why certain places in a play are laughed at by everybody at all performances in one city, while altogether different places in the same play produce the same results in other cities. We did not know why the new spectator did not accept the famous laughing places in a play as such, nor did we know how to change our individual and collective performances in order to reach the seat of his emotions. (MLIA)

 

CONSTANT STANISLAVSKI (120) ·

The words and wisdom of Constantin Stanislavski:

When . . . somebody advised Chekhov to write a play about the [Russo-Japanese] war, the great writer was insulted:

“Listen,” he said, “it is necessary that twenty years should pass. It is impossible to speak of it now. It is necessary that the world should be in repose. Only then can an author be unprejudiced.” (MLIA)

CONSTANT STANISLAVSKI (119) ·

The words and wisdom of Constantin Stanislavski:

What torture it is to feel truthfully but to incarnify your true feelings falsely and in unworthy form. I bore these pains for two seasons in . . . [a] role beyond my strength. . . . What is important is that after this production I could say to myself: “I know that I know nothing.” (MLIA)

CONSTANT STANISLAVSKI (117) ·

The words and wisdom of Constantin Stanislavski:

[With] Turgenev’s A Month in the Country . . . built on the most delicate curves of love experience. . . . it was necessary to do away with all that might interfere with the spectator’s process of entering into the souls of the actors through the eyes or from receiving, through the voice and its intonations, the inner essence of the feelings and thoughts of the characters of the play. . . . [The solution] was to let the actors sit without moving, let them feel, speak, and infect the spectator with the manner in which they live their roles . . . as to display the inner essence and the word picture of the spiritual lacework. . . . (MLIA)

CONSTANT STANISLAVSKI (116) ·

The words and wisdom of Constantin Stanislavski:

[It was in our production of Cricket on the Hearth, based on Dickens], perhaps, that there sounded for the first time those deep and heartfelt tones of superconscious feeling in the measure and the form in which I dreamed of them at that time, and which did not find place in the large and uncomfortable auditorium of a regular theatre where the actors were forced to raise and strain their voices and to stress their acting theatrically. The spectator did not know the true reasons, nor our ingenuity which gave him a feeling of and nearness with the actors, and credited the whole result to the actors themselves. The scenery and properties were of the simplest, without any unnecessary details. (MLIA)

CONSTANT STANISLAVSKI (115) ·

The words and wisdom of Constantin Stanislavski:

People who meet daily in the nervous atmosphere of the stage cannot establish those close and friendly relations which are necessary for true co-operation in art. But, if besides meeting on the stage, they met in nature, in common work on the soil, in fresh air, in the light of the sun, their souls would open, their physical labor would aid in the creation of unison among them. (MLIA)

CONSTANT STANISLAVSKI (114) ·


The words and wisdom of Constantin Stanislavski:

I had dreamed that the actor who grew up in [our Studios] would make his first timid steps in a small room which was built so as not to violate the inner creative life of the beginning artist. With this aim in mind the auditorium of the Studio was built in a private apartment and seated between one hundred and one hundred and fifty spectators, who were arranged in an amphitheatre that rose upward from the stage. . . . The actors were separated from the public by a simple cloth curtain. This created an altogether exceptional intimacy, and it seemed to the spectators that they were sitting in the very place where the action of the play was going on, that they were not spectators, but accidental witnesses of a strange life. (MLIA)