(Daniel Pollack-Pelzner’s article appeared in the New Yorker, 2/19.)

In 1989, a young professor named Gary Taylor published “Reinventing Shakespeare,” in which he argued that Shakespeare’s unrivalled literary status derives less from the sheer greatness of his plays than from the cultural institutions that have mythologized the Bard, elevating him above equally talented Renaissance playwrights. “Shakespeare was a star, but never the only one in our galaxy,” Taylor wrote. The book was his second major attempt to counter the view of Shakespeare as a singular genius; a few years earlier, he had served as one of two general editors of the Oxford Shakespeare, which credited co-authors for five of Shakespeare’s plays. In “Reinventing Shakespeare,” Taylor wrote that the Oxford Shakespeare “repeatedly shocks its readers, and knows that it will.”

(Read more)

http://www.newyorker.com/books/page-turner/the-radical-argument-of-the-new-oxford-shakespeare?utm_source=wordfly&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=ShakespearePlus22Feb2017&utm_content=version_A&promo=

Above, painting of Christopher Marlowe.)

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