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‘THE WEREWOLF OF WASHINGTON HEIGHTS’—NEXT ON THE STAGE VOICES CALENDAR ·

Carnival Girls Production of ‘The Werewolf of Washington Heights’

 

When a teenager vanishes, loved ones are forced to face hidden monsters and terrifying truths.

Kraine Theater
85 East 4th Street, NYC

Wednesday, October 11 @ 7 pm
Thursday, October 12 @ 7 pm
Friday, October 13 @ 7 pm
Saturday, October 14 @ 7 pm

Thursday, October 19 @ 7 pm
Friday, October 20 @ 7 pm
Saturday, October 21 @ 7 pm
Sunday, October 22 @ 2 pm

Director – Charmaine Broad, Choreographer – Anissa Barbato, Stage Manager – Erinn Conlon, Light Designer – Helen Blash, Set Guru – Stephanie Ervin, Costume Mistress – Tanya Bernardson, Box Office Manager – Ann Shepherd, Production Assistant – Zoe Scott, Charity Coordinator – Elizabeth Pitman Gretter

Featuring
Rosina Fernhoff*, Lori Funk*, Pilar Gonzalez, Stephanie Annette Johnson, Zarra Kaahn, Arlene McGruder, Sheila Joon Ostadazim*, Melanie Ryan, Galit Sperling

*These actors are appearing courtesy of Actors’ Equity Association
The Werewolf of Washington Heights is an Equity approved Showcase

Visit: http://www.christieperfetti.com/

Performances take place at Kraine Theater, located at 85 East 4th Street
(Between 2nd & 3rd F to 2nd Avenue 4/6 to Astor Place N/R to 8th Street)

 

KEITH HAMILTON COBB’S ‘AMERICAN MOOR’–SENOVVA, INC. AND PHOENIX THEATRE ENSEMBLE ANNOUNCE INVITATION-ONLY PERFORMANCES ·

AWARD-WINNING PLAY AT THE PERSHING SQUARE SIGNATURE CENTER OCTOBER 2ND @ 2PM & 6PM FOLLOW-UP TO HIGHLY SUCCESSFUL RUN AT BOSTON CENTER FOR THE ARTS 

Phoenix Theatre Ensemble and SenovvA, Inc. announce that Keith Hamilton Cobb’s explosive American Moor will play for two invitation-only performances at The Romulus Linney Courtyard Theatre, The Pershing Square Signature Center at 480 West 42nd Street on Monday, October 2nd at 2:00 pm and 6:00 pm.

-A black actor auditioning for the role of Othello, finds himself torn between wanting the role of a lifetime and having to engage an age-old process that invariably ends up with a large black man on stage responding to white decision makers who presume to understand, and ultimately dictate, how a charismatic, intelligent, black man should behave in society.  Things can get a little tense… –

Shakespeare, race, and America…not necessarily in that order are explored in AMERICAN MOOR directed by Drama Desk nominee Kim Weild.  

Josh Tyson joins Mr. Cobb in the cast, Caleb Spivey is production stage manager.  

Powerful, dynamic, humorous, confrontational and ironic, yet truthful throughout,

American Moor played in Boston for 4 weeks to rapturous reviews:

 “Spellbinding…A Must See… some plays, and some performances, take the idea of necessary to a deeper level. In those rare cases, the critic’s adjectival exhortation “must-see’’ can almost border on the literal. “American Moor’’ is one such play and one such performance.”” – Don Aucoin, The Boston Globe;   

“This is a rare example of a play about which you can say, without hyperbole, that it’s riveting: You hang on every well-chosen, robustly presented word. “American Moor” is both urgent art and an important political statement.” –Edge Media Network  

“Our highest recommendation!“  -Boston Examiner 

“This piece discusses race relations in theatre, and in the United States, like nothing I’ve ever seen before. It expresses the anger, the rage, the joy, the triumph, and the utter frustration of the black male performer explicitly and humanly.” –New England Theatre Geek

The script was honored by being inducted in the permanent collection of The Folger Shakespeare Library.  Michael Witmore, Director of the Library, stated “Keith Hamilton Cobb’s American Moor is incredible…I have spent my life thinking about Shakespeare, but that did not prepare me for the depth of thinking and feeling that his performance provoked.” 

What:   AMERICAN MOOR by Keith Hamilton Cobb 

When:  Monday, October 2 at 2:00 pm and 6:00 pm

Where: The Romulus Linney Courtyard Theatre, The Pershing Square Signature Center at 480 West on 42 Street.

Information: Craig@PhoenixTheatreEnsemble.org;  212-465-3446

SenovvA,Inc. SenovvA, Producers — Founded in 2005, SenovvA has produced, general managed, supervised, developed and/or designed over 200 theatrical productions internationally. With the latest addition of Production Core, more recent projects include (partial list): (Broadway) Hedwig, Sideshow, Lucky Guy, American Idiot, Bring it On, Tuck Everlasting and [title of show] – (Off-Broadway) Jersey Boys (opens November 2017), Red Roses, Green Gold (opens October 2017), In and of Itself, Curvy Widow, Trip of Love, Fellowship! The Musical Parody, Queen of Wyoming and Peter and the Starcatcher. In Television, SenovvA is well known for its work on live broadcast productions that include The Academy Awards, Kennedy Center Honors, Emmy Awards, Billboard AwardsKids Choice Awards, to name just a few. Beyond live production, SenovvA’s client list includes Silicon Valley giants for ongoing architectural projects worldwide. In NY, SenovvA is currently a proud participant at the largest real estate development project in North America, Hudson Yards. Find out more about the 400+ projects a year at SenovvA.com 

Phoenix Theatre Ensemble:  A non-profit 501(C)3 company now in its 13th season. Under the leadership of Elise Stone, Artistic Director, and Craig Smith, Producing Artistic Director, Phoenix Theatre Ensemble presents 3-5 mainstage productions annually, a reading series, a new play development program, and an arts-in-education program in NYC Public Schools. Mainstage productions this season include Tartuffe by Moliere, The Cult Play by Topher Cusumano, and Klaus Mann’s Mephisto. PTE is the recipient of NYIT Award Nominations, 3 NYIT Awards, and an Audelco Award. The company is a constituent of Network of Ensemble Theatres, ART/NY, Theatre Communications Group, and League of Independent Theatres.

Photo Credit:  Chris Lang 

ALBERT INNAURATO, REST IN PEACE (1947-2017) ·

(Neil Genzlinger’s article appeared in The New York Times, 9/27; via Pam Green.)

Albert Innaurato, a playwright who enjoyed spectacular success for a time in the late 1970s, including having a play run on Broadway for more than four years, has died in Philadelphia. He was 70.

His cousin Stephen Paesani said Mr. Innaurato was found dead in his bed on Tuesday, and had probably been dead for two days. The cause was not clear, Mr. Paesani said, but Mr. Innaurato had had heart problems recently.

Mr. Innaurato’s biggest hit, written while he was still in his 20s, was “Gemini,” a comic drama about a Harvard student who returns to his blue-collar Philadelphia neighborhood for his 21st birthday and has to confront, among other things, his sexual orientation. It opened on May 21, 1977, at the Little Theater on Broadway and ran for 1,819 performances.

A few months before that, another of his plays, “The Transfiguration of Benno Blimpie,” had an acclaimed Off Broadway run at the Astor Place Theater.

(Read more)

https://mobile.nytimes.com/2017/09/27/theater/albert-innaurato-dead-playwright-who-had-hits-on-broadway-in-70s.html

‘THE CLIMBERS’ BY CLYDE FITCH (METROPOLITAN PLAYHOUSE–9/8-10/8)—NEXT ON THE STAGE VOICES CALENDAR ·

‘THE CLIMBERS’ BY CLYDE FITCH (METROPOLITAN PLAYHOUSE)

ABOUT:

ARE WE THERE, YET?

By Alex Roe

In the land of opportunity, no star is beyond our grasp. No aspiration is too high, if only we will reach for it.  But is the invitation to continually strive a gift, or a curse? Is opportunity-worship devotion to a jealous idol? Is it, in fact, a goblin haunting the American dream? 

Farcical and heartbreaking by turns, Clyde Fitch’s 1901 The Climbers defies easy categorization, but by changing its own tone, this long-overlooked play captures  an elusive quarry and an essential conundrum for the American social animal.  At the dawn of the 20th century, the altruistic and esteemed head of the Hunter family  has died before his time, leaving his wife and three daughters with an unwelcome surprise. Desperate in his final months to keep up with the demands of their extravagant social life, he made a risky investment and lost the family’s once substantial fortune, leaving them with no assets or income at all. 

If the fires of adversity prove one’s mettle, the various members of this family seem to be made of different stuff. Mr. Hunter’s widow, youngest daughter, and son-in-law scheme to dupe others into making up their losses. Meanwhile, his sister and two elder  daughters vow to care for themselves and their families whatever the personal costs.  From these different campaigns spring both the wicked comedy and tender pathos of the play. 

(Read more)

http://metropolitanplayhouse.org/essayclimbers

and Read more….The Clyde Fitch Report

Photo: L to R: Levi Adkins, Becca Ballenger, Margaret Catov, Matt McAllister
Alexandra Anne, Erin Leigh Schmoyer, Marc LeVasseur, David Licht,
Erin Beirnard (concealed), Alyssa Simonb
photo: Tanya Parks

ELEVATOR REPAIR SERVICE TACKLES SHAKESPEARE’S ‘MEASURE FOR MEASURE’ ·

(Jason Zinoman’s article appeared in The New York Times, 9/14; via Pam Green.)

Elevator Repair Service, one of the city’s few truly essential theater companies, has always delighted in a good problem, whether it’s how to dramatize oral arguments from the Supreme Court or stage the famously difficult-to-adapt novel “The Great Gatsby” without sacrificing a word. So it makes sense that when its artistic director, John Collins, decided to direct his first Shakespeare, he decided on “Measure for Measure,” perhaps Shakespeare’s most problematic of problem plays.

(Read more)

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/14/theater/elevator-repair-service-tackles-shakespeares-problem-play.html

Photo: Elevator Repair Service

WILL THE OLD GAY PLAY HAVE SOMETHING NEW TO SAY? ·

(Jesse Green’s article appeared in The New York Times, 9/7; via Pam Green.)  

Many of us who arrived in New York in the last decades of the last century, looking to the theater for news about what it meant to be gay, found ourselves serially disheartened.

Starting with Mart Crowley’s “The Boys in the Band” in 1968, and continuing with Harvey Fierstein’s “Torch Song Trilogy” about a dozen years later, we faced quite a fun house mirror of gay life. Or perhaps a house of horrors.

“The Boys in the Band,” daring in its forthrightness, situated its characters on a Kinsey scale from four to six and a psychological spectrum from damaged to desperate. Arnold Beckoff, the protagonist of “Torch Song Trilogy,” could have been one of them. Though sympathetic and sassy, he was still a drag queen in an era that did not valorize that.

(Read more)

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/07/theater/will-the-old-gay-play-have-something-new-to-say.html?rref=collection%2Fbyline%2Fjesse-green&action=click&contentCollection=undefined&region=stream&module=stream_unit&version=latest&contentPlacement=2&pgtype=collection

 

THE KITCHEN IS HER STAGE. (IT COULD ACTUALLY BE YOUR KITCHEN.) ·

(Ligaya Mishan’s article appeared in The New York Time, 8/30; via Pam Green.)

The rehearsal room smelled of onions slackening in a pan. They hissed on the stove, in the basement of a Lutheran church in Greenpoint, Brooklyn, as Nadine Malouf hacked at a slab of beef, her eyes fixed on her director, Amir Nizar Zuabi, and not the knife, which was closing in on her fingertips.

“I don’t want her to cut herself,” Mr. Zuabi said, seated in a folding chair nearby. “But I want her to make mistakes.”

It was the third day of rehearsals for “Oh My Sweet Land,” Mr. Zuabi’s 2013 play about a woman (Ms. Malouf) of Syrian-German descent whose search for a lost lover takes her from a sheltered life in Paris to the refugee camps of Lebanon and Jordan and finally into Syria, to confront the smoldering remains of her cultural inheritance. First performed in Lausanne, Switzerland, and then in London at the Young Vic, where Mr. Zuabi is an international associate, the one-woman show will have its United States premiere in New York on Friday, Sept. 8, presented by the Play Company.

But the location is a mystery — even to Ms. Malouf, 30, who won’t have a chance to see where she’ll be performing until half an hour before showtime almost every night. For Mr. Zuabi, displacement is integral to the narrative. Ms. Malouf will be forced to navigate unfamiliar surroundings again and again. “Every kitchen will have a new geography,” Mr. Zuabi, 41, said. “Every evening will be a new voyage.”

(Read more)

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/08/30/theater/oh-my-sweet-land-amir-nizar-zuabi.html

RACE, MONEY AND BROADWAY: HOW ‘GREAT COMET’ BURNED OUT ·

(Michael Paulson’s article appeared in The New York Times, 8/29; via Pam Green.)

“Natasha, Pierre & the Great Comet of 1812” is closing on Broadway after a racially charged and distinctly contemporary conflagration. CreditSam Hodgson for The New York Times

The young, flamboyant and unusually diverse collective of actors and musicians who brought “Natasha, Pierre & the Great Comet of 1812” to Broadway enjoyed the giddy highs of theater’s most glamorous perch — a run at the grand Imperial Theater, a season-topping 12 Tony nominations, a spotlight shared with the pop star Josh Groban.

For most of the performers, it was their first time on a Broadway stage. Costumed as punkified peasants and aristocrats in a bold musical adaptation of Tolstoy, they danced down the aisles, handing out pierogies and creating an unusually immersive musical experience.

Now they are seeing the sharp edge of Broadway. The show is collapsing after a conflagration that was racially charged and distinctly contemporary: a social media uproar prompted by the financially motivated decision to bring in a white actor to replace a black actor who had succeeded a white actor.

The result: Investors will lose most of the production’s $14 million capitalization, and more than 100 people will be out of jobs after the final performance on Sunday.

Even in a flop-prone industry, the sudden crash of the musical stands out, reflecting competing challenges for commercial theater: the benefits of star power, the hunger for diversity and the high costs of producing on Broadway. Add in Twitter, and things can get messy.

Continue reading the main story

PHOENIX THEATRE ENSEMBLE: CASTING ANNOUNCED FOR MOLIERE’S HILARIOUS ‘TARTUFFE’ ·

PTE’s 2017-18 season is dedicated to “The Charismatic”–why do we often quite unreasonably follow certain people, faiths or ideas.  We start off with Moliere’s brilliant comedy! Tartuffe is a charismatic who has been touched by God. He is a visionary. He practices religious devotion and self-sacrifice. He has fits. He converses with the divine. He can be very scary. Orgon invites him home to live with his family and introduces him to his beautiful wife Elmire…. what could possibly go wrong? Join us for Moliere’s brilliant comedy….

 TICKETS NOW ON SALE
or call 212-352-3101
Low Price Previews: 10/21, 10/24-26; NO TDF for This Show

Josh Tyson
Tartuffe
Ariel Estrada
Cleante
John  Lenartz
Orgon
Oscar Klausner
Laurant
Alicia Marie Beatty
Marianne
Elise Stone
Elmire
Morgan Rosse
Dorine
Adapted by David Ball; Directed by Craig Smith; Costume Design by Debbi Hobson; Music and Sound Design by Ellen Mandel; Video Design by Attilio Rigotti, Stage Management by Meghan McVann, Assistant Director Karen Case Cook.
Wes Spencer
Valere
Matt Baguth
Damis
Eileen Glenn
Pernelle
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@The Wild Project, 195 East 3rd Street

“This space is a standout… stunning!”-Time Out

Great restaurants & Bars just steps away in the heart of the East Village.

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WAS BRITISH SPY, NOVELIST, AND PLAYWRIGHT, SOMERSET MAUGHAM SENT TO KILL LENIN? ·

(Alexey Timofeychev’s article appeared in Russia Beyound the Headlines, 7/13.)

Everyone knows Maugham’s plays and novels, but his work for British intelligence in Russia in 1917 is less known. He had a daunting mission and was certain that if he’d had more time he could have averted the Bolshevik victory in the Russian Revolution.

The author of Theatre, and The Razor’s Edge was an agent of the British Secret Intelligence Service during World War I, and he was entrusted with a secret mission to Russia, the true nature of which remains a mystery even 100 years later.

The trip to Russia in 1917 was not Maugham’s first experience as a secret agent for British Intelligence. By then he had already worked a couple of years for what later would be known as MI-6. After his first mission in Switzerland in 1915 he wanted to quit for personal reasons – he had divorced and his male lover had been sent out of Britain. However, according to one of his biographers, Maugham was intrigued by the life of a secret agent because he liked pulling strings from behind the scenes.

Nevertheless, when he was approached with the chance to go to Russia, he was uncertain. As he recalled afterwards, he thought that he didn’t have the right qualities for the task. In the end, the desire “to see the country of Tolstoi, Dostoievski and Chekov” outweighed any doubts, and he accepted.

(Read more)

https://www.rbth.com/arts/history/2017/07/13/was-british-spy-somerset-maugham-sent-to-kill-lenin_800942