Category Archives: Current Affairs

REVIEW: ARTHUR MILLER’S DYING ‘SALESMAN’ IS REBORN IN LONDON ·

(Ben Brantley’s article appeared in The New York Times, 1/ 2; via Pam Green.  Those who like Death of a Salesman may also enjoy End Zone, playing at Dixon Place, 2/25.)

An electrifying revival, starring a heartbreaking Wendell Pierce, reimagines Willy Loman as a black man in a white man’s world.

LONDON — The tired old man has had an unexpected transfusion. And he has seldom seemed more alive — or more doomed.

What’s most surprising about Marianne Elliott and Miranda Cromwell’s beautiful revival of Arthur Miller’s “Death of a Salesman,” which I mercifully caught near the end of its West End run here at the Piccadilly Theater, is how vital it is. As Willy Loman, the title character of this epochal 1949 drama, lives out his last, despondent days, what has often felt like a plodding walk to the grave in previous incarnations becomes a propulsive — and compulsively watchable — dance of death.

Portrayed by a splendid Wendell Pierce (“The Wire” and “Treme” on television), Willy lacks the stooped shoulders and slumped back with which he is traditionally associated. (It’s the posture immortalized in the book cover for the original script.)

This electrically alert and eager Willy nearly always stands ramrod tall in this production, which originated at the Young Vic Theater, though you sense it’s an effort. When we first see him, newly returned to his Brooklyn home from an aborted road trip, he bends to put down the sample case he holds in each hand. And for a painful second, he registers how much it hurts him to straighten up again.

(Read more)

Photo: Brinkhoff-Moegenburg

THEATER RESOURCES UNLIMITED JANUARY PANEL DISCUSSION NEW YEAR, NEW RULES:  THE UPDATED EQUITY AGREEMENTS AND CONTRACTS THURSDAY, JANUARY 16, 2020 ·

(via Michelle Tabnick)

BE A PRODUCER!

Theater Resources Unlimited (TRU) presents the January Panel, New Year, New Rules: The Updated Equity Agreements and Contracts, on Thursday, January 16, 2020 at 7:30pm at Polaris North Theater, 245 W. 29th Street, 4th floor, NYC. E-mail TRUStaff1@gmail.com or register online at https://truonline.org/events/new-year-new-rules/.

Equity is constantly evolving in an effort to serve their members fairly, and also keep up with the realities of the business. There have been some recent new understandings that have come to light, as well as some new interpretations of existing rules, and all of it will impact the way we approach early development of new work. This panel will help us learn about the new Equity development contracts: Tier 1, 2 & 3. What do they mean? How do they replace the previous terms “Workshop,” “Laboratory,” and other developmental contracts? Equity is changing their rules, and every producer needs to be up to speed on what the new rules are.

Panelists to include general manager Evan Bernardin of Evan Bernardin Productions (National Tours of Million Dollar QuartetCharlie Brown Christmas Live; Off  Broadway  AfterglowMustDiasporaCounting Sheep); TRU literary manager Cate Cammarata, director, producer (My Life Is a Musical, The Assignment, My Father’s Daughter), Martin Platt of Perry Street Theatricals (Dames at Sea on Broadway, Vanya & Sonia & Masha & Spike; off-Broadway: Bedlam’s Hamlet/St. JoanSense & SensibilityGeorgiean oak tree, In the Continuum; Lend Me a Tenor the musical in London); plus a representative from Equity.

Doors open at 7:00pm for networking and refreshments, roundtable introductions of everyone in the room will start at 7:30pm – come prepared with your best half-minute summary of who you are, and what you need. Free for TRU members; $13.00 for non-members ($16 at the door). Please reserve online at https://truonline.org/events/new-year-new-rules/, call at least a day in advance (or much sooner) for reservations: 833-506-5550, or email TRUStaff1@gmail.com.

Theater Resources Unlimited (TRU) is the leading network for developing theater professionals, a twenty-seven-year-old 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization created to help producers produce, emerging theater companies to emerge healthily and all theater professionals to understand and navigate the business of the arts. Membership includes self-producing artists as well as career producers and theater companies.

TRU publishes an email community newsletter of services, goods and productions; offers a Producer Development & Mentorship Program taught by prominent producers and general managers in New York theater, and also presents Producer Boot Camp workshops to help aspirants develop business skills. TRU serves writers through a Writer-Producer Speed Date, a Practical Playwriting Workshop, How to Write a Musical That Works and a Director-Writer Communications Lab; programs for actors include the Annual Combined Audition.

Programs of Theater Resources Unlimited are supported in part by public funds awarded through the New York State Council on the Arts (NYSCA) with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature, as well as the Montage Foundation and the Leibowitz Greenway Foundation.

For more information about TRU membership and programs, visit www.truonline.org.

Photos (top to bottom): Evan Bernardin, Cate Cammarata, Martin Platt; photos via Tru site. 

 

 

DIXON PLACE ANNOUNCES 2020 SEASON AND CRIMINAL QUEERNESS FESTIVAL CO-PRODUCTION WITH NATIONAL QUEER THEATER ·

Dixon Place is thrilled to announce our 2020 season, featuring nine commissioned original productions and four puppetry productions, including Concrete Temple Theatre, Sara Juli, Eszter Balint & Stew, Shayna Strype, Rachel Klein, Nora Burns, Marga Gomez, Maria Camia, Andy Manjuck, Dorothy James and Arif Silverman. 

Additionally, Dixon Place is proud to co-produce and present the Criminal Queerness Festival with National Queer Theater in June. Following the success of last year’s inaugural Criminal Queerness Festival—featured on “Best of Pride” lists in The New York Times, The Advocate, and Thrillist—the 2020 Festival will feature original works by four renowned queer playwrights from around the world. Dixon Place is located at 161A Chrystie Street in Manhattan, for tickets and further information please visit www.dixonplace.org 

 

THEATER, PUPPETRY

January 31 – February 14, 2020

Concrete Temple Theatre 

Packrat

Created by Carlo Adinolfi & Renee Philippi

 

Set deep in the Sagebrush Desert, this visually stunning puppet-forward play contemplates humanity’s relationship with the natural world. Puppetry, projections and an original score elegantly come together to create many layers of meaning and emotion, presented simply and elegantly with engaging and captivating puppets ranging from Bunraku to Pageant styles. 

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DANCE, COMEDY, THEATER
February 21 – 28, 2020
New York City Premiere
Burnt-Out Wife
Created & performed by Sara Juli

With her comically idiosyncratic text-driven dance style, Juli takes on monogamy, intimacy, loneliness, sex deprivation, and other impossibilities of marriage. In a pepto-bismol pink bathroom, this dance-theater-comedy tackles the taboo and urgent social topic of the detritus of committed partnerships, sparking intimate conversations while blowing up the marital institution with humor, controversy, and explicit personal musing and disclosure. For mature audiences only.

 

 

MUSIC, THEATER
March 20 – 28, 2020

I Hate Memory
Written by Eszter Balint

Songs by Eszter Balint & StewFeaturing: The Musicians 

Directed by Lucy Sexton

Media Design: Tal Yarden

Musical director: David Nagler

 

An anti-cabaret co-starring the Streets of New York and the Late 20th Century, the show features appearances by family, film, fame, immigration, joy, theater, shame, dance floors, open doors, papaya ice cream, and the Shah of Iran’s wife. This reluctant memoir is served on a bed of song and dirt, with a punk aperitif and Jimmy Carter for dessert. 

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THEATER, PUPPETRY

April 10 – 25, 2020

MINE

Created & performed by Shayna Strype

Live Feed Camera/Dramaturgy by Desiree Mitton 

 

MINE uses a variety of puppetry styles, live-feed projections, stop-motion animation, wearable sculptures, and humor to weave together themes of nostalgia, excess, and the destructive human urge to colonize land, bodies, and minds. 

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DANCE,THEATER

May 1 – 16, 2020

Breaking Glass

Conceived & Directed by Rachel Klein

Choreography by Rachel Klein, Danielle Marie Fusco, & the ensemble

Aerial Choreography by Summer Lacy and Chloe Goolsby

Featuring: Danielle Marie Fusco, Summer Lacy, Chloe Goolsby, Federico Garcia, Shoko Fujita, Joey Kipp, Manuela Agudelo, Connor Dealy, Stephanie Nobel, Amy Mack, Ricardo Barrett, & Andrea Dusel-Foil

 

Breaking Glass follows the plight of the Furies, three tenacious heroines who enter a land of Kings, confronted with outrage from the ruling class as they fight to earn their place as respected leaders. Through an allegorical dreamscape, this deeply personal piece inspired by true events serves to break down the barriers of intolerance through profoundly inspiring performances.

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THEATER, DANCE, QUEER INTEREST

May 20 – 30, 2020

The Village, or A Fag*, A Hag*, a Drag*, a Hustler*, a John*, a Junkie* and a Jew* Walk into a Bar (*sorry, *I know, *wrong, *dated, *what, *stop, *really?!) 

Written by Nora Burns

Directed by Mike Albo

Choreographed by Robin Carrigan

 

1979, New York City. Trade, a hustler living in “Old George’s” apartment, brings home his latest trick, Steve, an earnest NYU student, as friends, neighbors and addicts come by to drink, drug, flirt, dream and dish about love, life, death and taxis. A Village, or… is a dance-filled disco comedy with an ensemble cast of eight (plus gorgeous go-go boys!), a meta musical with high jinks, low kinks, softcore porn and rock hard abs very loosely based on Our Town, with apologies to Thornton Wilder. 

 

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THEATER, QUEER INTREST

June 2020

Criminal Queerness Festival

Curated by National Queer Theater

Bringing together renowned queer playwrights from around the world, National Queer Theater and Dixon Place are providing a platform for artists facing censorship, shining a light on critical stories from across the globe. In order to build a truly global queer community, these writers are inspiring activism and shaping our culture towards the equitable treatment of LGBTQ people around the world. A Mayor’s Grant for Cultural Impact awardee, the festival is proud to partner with the Mayor’s Office of Immigrant Affairs for community engagement and outreach. Don’t miss The New York Times and The Advocate recommended theatrical event of the Pride season!

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THEATER, QUEER INTREST

July 16 – 25, 2020

Spanking Machine

Written & Performed by Marga Gomez

Directed by Adrian Alexander Alea

 

In Spanking Machine, GLAAD Award-winning writer/performer Marga Gomez shifts across gender, latitudes and generations in a darkly comic memoir about the first boy she ever sloppy-kissed and how it made them gay forever.

 

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THEATER, PUPPETRY

September 18 – 26, 2020

New Mony

Created by Maria Camia

Puppeteers: Leonie Bell, Maria Camia, Connie Fu, Marcella Murray, Leah Ogawa

 

Step into the colorful, comical, spiritual, sci-fi world of Aricama where we explore duality and ancestry with puppets, Toy Theater, body costumes, original live music, and projections in this full-length workshop production. 

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THEATER, PUPPETRY

October 2020, dates to be announced

Bill’s 44th

Created & performed by Andy Manjuck & Dorothy James 

 

Drawing from Bunraku and character driven object theatre, Bill’s 44th examines the loneliness of one man puppeteered by two people. He throws himself a party which isn’t well attended, and attempts to cheer himself up by creating some friends out of crudité and party balloons. Against all odds he succeeds and finds himself having a grand old time, but when a “real” guest arrives a wave of shame comes over him and he quickly destroys his newly created friends.

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THEATER,PLAY

November 6 – 21, 2020

World Premiere 

Dream of Rays 

Written by Arif Silverman

Directed by Lillian White

Featuring visuals by Julia Melfi

 

Not all is as it seems aboard Commander Viola Nightfire’s ship The Mad Wraith. Nightfire and her crew have been tasked by the Queen of the Silvercliffs to sail west and capture a school of singing Manta Rays, in hopes their ethereal, transcendent voices will restore the dying waters of their seaside kingdom. Grudges and deceptions run rampant, exacerbated by the presence of the Queen’s mysterious ambassador. With a cast of ten, Dream of Rays is a wild new play that explores the different ways humankind can react to the prospect of a crumbling world.

 

Dixon Place

An artistic incubator since 1986, Dixon Place is a Bessie and Obie Award-winning non-profit institution committed to supporting the creative process by presenting original works of theater, dance, music, puppetry, circus arts, literature and visual art at all stages of development.  Presenting over 1000 creators a year, this local haven inspires and encourages diverse artists of all stripes and callings to take risks, generate new ideas and consummate new practices. Many artists, such as Blue Man Group, John Leguizamo, Lisa Kron, David Cale, David Drake, Deb Margolin and Reno, began their careers at DP. In addition to emerging artists, Dixon Place has been privileged to present established artists such as Mac Wellman, Holly Hughes, Justin Bond, Karen Finley, Kate Clinton and Martha Wainwright.  After spawning a salon in her Paris apartment in 1985, founding Artistic Director Ellie Covan pioneered the institution in her NYC living room for 23 years. Covan was a recipient of a Bessie, a New York Dance and Performance Award and a Bax10 Award for her service to the community. Dixon Place received two Obie Awards, and an Edwin Booth Award for Excellence in Theater. Dixon Place has organically developed and expanded into a leading professional, state-of-the-art facility for artistic expression. www.dixonplace.org 

 

Dixon Place’s 2020 season is made possible with public funds from the NYC Department of Cultural Affairs with support from the City Council/Councilmember Margaret Chin/ Manhattan Borough President/NYC Dept for the Aging/Materials for the Arts with support from the NYC Depts of Sanitation & Education; NY State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo & the NY State Legislature; NY State Assemblymember Deborah Glick with funds from NYS Office of Children & Family Services; and the National Endowment for the Arts; and with private support from Axe-Houghton Foundation, Dramatists Guild Fund, Gerald J. & Dorothy R. Friedman Foundation, The Howard Gilman Foundation, The Greater New Orleans Foundation, The Harkness Foundation for Dance, The Jane Henson Foundation, The Jim Henson Foundation, The Jerome Foundation, The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, Mertz Gilmore Foundation, Poets & Writers, The Jerome Robbins Foundation, The Fan Fox and Leslie R. Samuels Foundation and The Shubert Foundation. New England Foundation for the Arts’ National Dance Project, with lead funding from Doris Duke Charitable Foundation and Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. 

HOW A JERRY HERMAN SONG LANDED A TRIPLE PUNCH ·

(Jesse Green’s article appeared in The New York Times, 12/27; via Pam Green.)

A comedy number from the flop “Mack & Mabel” found the unexpected sweet spot between Irving Berlin and Stephen Sondheim.

It was always a canard that Jerry Herman, the big-thump tunesmith, and Stephen Sondheim, the big-think musical dramatist, represented opposing and hostile camps.

 

In fact, they were doing the same thing: finding ways to make characters sing as they must. Herman’s Mame couldn’t have pattered a list of cannibal puns any more than Sondheim’s Mrs. Lovett could have belted a brassy ballad about the boy that got away — though both perfectly suited Angela Lansbury, who introduced “If He Walked Into My Life,” in “Mame,” and “A Little Priest,” in “Sweeney Todd,” 13 years apart. The difference was in the stories Sondheim and Herman, who died on Thursday at 88, wanted to tell, leading their songs where they had to go.

(Read more)

 

IRISH THEATRE IN 2019: A DRAMATIC YEAR THAT LEFT THE FUTURE UNCERTAIN ·

(Peter Crawley’s article appeared in the Irish Times, 12/7.)

Theatre in Ireland this year was bookended by two crises, a state of play mirrored by the work  

It was a dramatic year for theatre, bookended by two moments of crisis. The first played out in the full glare of public attention. The other, which is happening now, has been observed more quietly, if at all.

Barely one week into 2019, Irish theatre was once again a news story. On January 7th, an open letter lambasting the Abbey’s production model, for Abbey directors Neil Murray and Graham McLaren’s perceived overreliance on staging co-productions and insufficient employment opportunities at the National Theatre, among other grievances, was signed by 312 theatre professionals.

So began a turbulent year for the Abbey, which dealt with the fallout in media statements, a tense committee hearing in the Oireachtas, and a series of meetings with industry representatives, finally yielding commitments and outcomes. By the time it announced its programme for 2020 this month, with a balance between self-produced and co-produced work that did not appear radically different, the outcry had faded away, either because communication between involved parties had become clearer, or because such an explosion of protest could only immolate the building or fizzle out.

Overshadowed by the furore at the time was the kind of co-production in question, when Karl Shiels brought his dark double-bill The Ridleys to the Peacock. This might have been a breakout moment for Shiels’s Theatre Upstairs, the actor/director’s tenacious home for short-form new writing, and a launch pad for new careers.

Sadly, it turned out to be the theatre’s swansong: a couple of months later, Theatre Upstairs announced its closure after nine years in business. In any circumstances, the end of a venue committed exclusively to new work would feel unnatural, like the loss of promise. But that sensation became unbearably tragic in July when Shiels, a tireless advocate for new artists and energising audiences, died at the age of 47.

(Read more)

Photo: Irish Times

LA CAGE AUX FOLLES, HELLO, DOLLY! COMPOSER AND BROADWAY LEGEND JERRY HERMAN DIES AT 88 ·

(Mark Kennedy’s article appeared in Time Magazine, 10/27.)

Tony Award-winning composer Jerry Herman, who wrote the cheerful, good-natured music and lyrics for such classic shows as MameHello, Dolly! and La Cage aux Folles, died Thursday. He was 88.

His goddaughter Jane Dorian confirmed his death to The Associated Press early Friday. He died of pulmonary complications in Miami, where he had been living with his partner, real estate broker Terry Marler.

The creator of 10 Broadway shows and contributor to several more, Herman won two Tony Awards for best musical: Hello, Dolly! in 1964 and La Cage aux Folles in 1983. He also won two Grammys — for the Mame cast album and “Hello, Dolly!” as song of the year — and was a Kennedy Center honoree.

Herman wrote in the Rodgers and Hammerstein tradition, an optimistic composer at a time when others in his profession were exploring darker feelings and material. Just a few of his song titles revealed his depth of hope: “I’ll Be Here Tomorrow,” “The Best of Times,” “Tap Your Troubles Away,” “It’s Today,” “We Need a Little Christmas” and “Before the Parade Passes By.”  Even the title song to “Hello, Dolly!” is an advertisement to enjoy life.

(Read more)

Photo: Jack Robinson—Hulton Archive/Getty Images

200 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE, AND STILL LEARNING ONSTAGE ·

(Laura Collins-Hughes’s article appeared in The New York Times, 12/18; via Pam Green.)

Lois Smith, Estelle Parsons and Vinie Burrows on age, agility, perseverance and steering clear of “self-pitying old” roles.

“I am rarely cast as an ingénue anymore,” Lois Smith was saying on Monday afternoon. It was a joke, obviously, and her fellow actresses — Estelle Parsons, 92, and Vinie Burrows, who recently turned 95 but rounds that up to 96 — burst into laughter.

At 89, Smith was the baby of this bunch. Between them, they have more than 200 years of performance experience, including the film “Lady Bird” and the title role in “Marjorie Prime” (Smith), the movie “Bonnie and Clyde” and the sitcom “Roseanne” (Parsons), the American premiere of Jean Genet’s “The Blacks” and experimental work with the director Rachel Chavkin (Burrows).

They’re still busy adding to their résumés: Parsons currently at the Public Theater in Tony Kushner’s “A Bright Room Called Day,” as a character whose name translates to “The Old One”; Smith on Broadway, with a talky role in Matthew Lopez’s “The Inheritance”; Burrows back Off Broadway next month in “Chekhov/Tolstoy: Love Stories,” at the Mint Theater Company.

In the room with them, you’d never guess their ages from their appearance, only from the discussion’s vintage details — as when Burrows and Smith tried to figure out what they might have worked on together, and the closest they got was a play each of them did on Broadway with Helen Hayes. (Burrows was in the original 1950 production of “The Wisteria Trees,” Smith in the 1955 revival.)

(Read more)

Photo: Celeste Sloman for The New York Times

LET’S GO: ‘THE MIKADO’ FROM THE NEW YORK GILBERT & SULLIVAN PLAYERS, AMERICA’S PREEMINENT GILBERT & SULLIVAN REPERTORY ENSEMBLE ·

(via Sean Katz, Katz PR)

The New York Gilbert & Sullivan Players, America’s Preeminent Gilbert & Sullivan Repertory Ensemble, Presents

The Mikado

Novel Production of Enduring Classic

At The Kaye Playhouse at Hunter College

December 27, 2019 through January 5, 2020

(New York, NY – November 25) Since its founding in 1974, the New York Gilbert & Sullivan Players (NYGASP) has presented more than 2,000 performances of the Gilbert & Sullivan masterpieces throughout the United States, Canada and England, captivating audiences of all ages. America’s preeminent Gilbert & Sullivan Repertory Ensemble, continues its 45th season with its novel production of The Mikado, one of the most enduring musicals in theatrical history.

With 8 family friendly performances after Christmas, this production, which premiered to critical acclaim in December of 2016, will run at The Kaye Playhouse at Hunter College, 68th Street between Park and Lexington Avenues, Dec. 27, 2019 through Jan. 5, 2020.  Annual favorite special events include multi-generational Bring Your Grandparents Day (Dec. 30 – with pre and post show attractions) and Family Overture presentations before Saturday matinées (Dec. 28, Jan. 4 – musical introduction and plot summary made entertaining and free to all ticket holders).

The New York Times describes this production of The Mikado as “a comic gem” with “handsome designs, sharp acting and impressive singing.”

First performed at London’s Savoy Theatre in 1885, The Mikado pokes fun at topical aspects of Victorian society, but Gilbert & Sullivan cleverly cloak their satirical barbs behind a charming love story set in an imagined town in Japan, and NYGASP continues the time honored tradition of topical updating for a modern audience.  You’re sure to recognize someone on the “Lord High Executioner’s” comical list of people who “never would be missed”.

The show abounds with absurdity and astounding wit, clever wordplay, memorable tunes and endearing characters.  The romantic love story follows Nanki-Poo, the son of the Mikado (the Japanese emperor), who has fled his father’s court in disguise as a “Wand’ring Minstrel” to avoid marrying Katisha, an elderly suitor, and to find and marry his own beloved, the delicious maiden Yum-Yum, one of “Three Little Maids From School”. Yum-Yum, however, is the ward of Ko-Ko, the “Lord High Executioner”, and has become betrothed to him against her will.  As usual in a Gilbert & Sullivan imaginative plot, the tangled web unravels and everyone (well, almost everyone) lives happily ever after.

The NYGASP production features an original prologue that introduces the audience to the real life characters of the D’Oyly Carte Opera Company, which originated The Mikado in 1885 London, and emphasizes the work’s satire of human foibles and excesses that transcend generational and national bounds.  The comic opera will feature original choreography and direction by NYGASP Associate Stage Director David Auxier, who also authored the show’s prologue, and Assistant Direction by Broadway performer/director Kelvin Moon Loh.

The show’s cast includes: dynamic bass David Wannen in the title role; clever patter man David Macaluso as Sullivan and Ko-Ko; blustering Matthew Wages as Richard D’Oyly Carte and pompous Pooh-Bah; creative David Auxier as author Gilbert and town leader Pish-Tush; charming John Charles McLaughlin as romantic hero Nanki-Poo, formidable Caitlin Burke as lovelorn and overbearing Katisha; beautiful soprano Sarah Caldwell Smith as self-aware Yum Yum; Rebecca Hargrove as maiden sister Peep-Bo, and mellifluous mezzo Amy Maude Helfer as adventurous Pitti-Sing.

The production will showcase scenery designed by Anshuman Bhatia, costumes by Quinto Ott and lighting by Benjamin Weill.  The Mikado is produced by NYGASP Executive Director David Wannen. 

NYGASP has been hailed as “the leading custodian of the G&S classics” by New York Magazine and has created its own special niche in the cultural mosaic of New York City and the nation.  According to the Company’s Founder/Artistic Director/General Manager Albert Bergeret, NYGASP’s mission is “giving vitality to the living legacy of Gilbert & Sullivan.” He further adds that “everyone loves The Mikado and our new production, with its celebrated premise of imagination, keeps the revered story alive and colorful.”  As for his own participation in the storied production Bergeret states “I’m delighted to once more be involved in elevating the humor and musical values of this evolving and very theatrical production, while alternating on the conductor’s podium with my colleague, Joseph Rubin, as part of NYGASP’s commitment to the future development of the Company”.

 Performances:

Friday, Dec. 27, 2019 — 7:30 PM

Saturday, Dec. 28, 2019 — 2 PM* & 7:30 PM

Sunday, Dec. 29, 2019 — 3 PM

Monday, Dec. 30, 2019 — 3 PM**

Saturday, Jan. 4, 2020 — 2 PM* & 7:30 PM

Sunday, Jan. 5, 2020 — 3 PM

*Family Overture – Sat., Dec. 28 & Sat., Jan 4, at 12:45 PM (prior to the 2PM show) – Musical introduction and plot summary made entertaining for the entire family. Free to all ticket holders.

**Bring Your Grandparents Day – Monday, Dec. 30, at 1:45 PM – Respect your elders with a pre-show Family Overture and a backstage tour after the performance.

Ticket Prices

Orchestra: $95

Balcony: $50

Rear Balcony: $25

*Please note there is no elevator to the balcony*

Special Discounts:  50% off for children 12 and under accompanied by an adult. 10% off for seniors 65 and older.

Order by Phone:  212-772-4448

Order Online:  www.nygasp.org

Purchase in Person:  The Kaye Playhouse Box Office, 68thStreet between Park and Lexington Avenues. (Box Office Hours: Monday-Friday 12 PM-7PM)

Photo: Carol Rosegg