Category Archives: ‘ACTS OF WAR’ REVIEWS

COSMIN CHIVU ON TENNESSEE WILLIAMS: THE DIRECTOR TALKS ABOUT THE LATE PLAYS: ‘A RECLUSE AND HIS GUEST’ AND ‘THE REMARKABLE ROOMING-HOUSE OF MME. LE MONDE’–AND HOW FINALLY, NOW, YOU CAN SEE THEM AT ‘TENNESSEE WILLIAMS 1982’, FEBRUARY 14–MARCH 13 ·

Cosmin_chivu

Cosmin Chivu (director) is a Romanian-born theater artist, currently based in New York City, with an international career of award-winning productions. He has directed over 50 professional and university productions in America, Austria, England, Germany, Greece, Italy, Romania and Thailand, most recently Beautiful Province by Clarence Coo (LCT3), winner of the 2012 Yale New Drama Series, Something Cloudy Something Clear by Tennessee Williams at The Provincetown Tennessee Williams Theater Festival, a staged reading of Our Class by Tadeusz Slobodzianek at The Temple Emanu-El, Skirball Center, and the Off Broadway revival of Tennessee Williams’ The Mutilated starring Mink Stole and Penny Arcade, which was nominated for a Drama League Award for Best Revival in 2013. Chivu is a lifetime member of the Actors Studio, a member of the Lincoln Center Directors Lab, an alumnus of the Old Globe's Jack O’Brien fellowship and the founder of InterArt Theatre Group. Chivu is currently the Head of B.A. Acting/Directing Program, International Performance Ensemble at Pace University Performing Arts in New York City. He holds a Masters in Directing from the Actors Studio Drama School, New School University, NYC and a B.A. in Acting from the G. Enescu Art Academy, Romania. Visit cosminchivu.com to learn more.

 

Cosmin Chivu Gives an Exclusive Interview with

SV's Bob Shuman

Tennessee Williams’s longtime agent Audrey Wood thought the late work was less powerful than the early plays. Do you agree?

CC: I’m a big fan of the late work. It lives in the present. It is raw, filled with free, profound imagery, less conventional, sexual, playful, hilarious and highly political. But Williams’s new, creative phase needed to be even more widely appreciated—and treated with gentility.

Actually, it’s my understanding that Audrey Wood did not disapprove of the late work—according to another Williams agent, Mitch Douglas, she never stopped supporting Williams, even behind the scenes.

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NORMAN/RUSSELL/WILLIS/BRAY: ‘THE COLOR PURPLE’ (SV PICK, NY) ·

 

(Ben Brantley’s article appeared in The New York Times, 12/10.) 

Give thanks this morning, children of Broadway, and throw in a hearty hallelujah. “The Color Purple” has been born again, and its conversion is a glory to behold. 

The heart-clutching, gospel-flavored musical that opened at the Bernard B. Jacobs Theater on Thursday night — in a production led by an incandescent new star named Cynthia Erivo and, in her Broadway debut, an enchanting Jennifer Hudson — share a title, the same characters, the same source of inspiration (Alice Walker’s 1982 Pulitzer Prize-winning novel) and most of the same songs with “The Color Purple” seen on Broadway a decade ago. But, oh, what a difference there is between them.

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/12/11/theater/review-the-color-purple-on-broadway-stripped-to-its-essence.html

BOOK: ‘ACTS OF WAR: IRAQ AND AFGHANISTAN IN SEVEN PLAYS’ (FIRST REVIEW BY JEAN RANDICH FOR TRUTHDIG–“A VIGOROUS CONTRIBUTION TO THE POLITICAL AND ETHICAL DEBATE . . . POWERFUL.”) ·

(Randich’s article appeared 9/1.)

“Acts of War: Iraq and Afghanistan in Seven Plays”
A book edited by Karen Malpede, Michael Messina and Bob Shuman

“War is neither glorious nor noble,” Chris Hedges states in his trenchant foreword to “Acts of War: Iraq and Afghanistan in Seven Plays,” a powerful new collection of American and British plays. War marks those who battle, those who stay home and those caught in the crossfire in ways we can barely articulate. Given the cultural, political and religious taboos against discussing the actual human cost of warfare, Karen Malpede, Michael Messina and Bob Shuman, in editing this anthology, have made a vigorous contribution to the political and ethical debate.

These plays step into the moral vacuum left by politicians, corporations and religious leaders, and reveal war as something other than an unequivocal victory. They explore how theater can intervene in the discourse of war, rather than let it be hijacked by politicians, warmongers, war profiteers and others. They raise the necessary question: What are the responsibilities of civilians during wartime? Hedges opines that war is always about betrayal: “of the young by the old, of idealists by cynics, and of solders and Marines by politicians.” In these plays, we hear the voices of the betrayers and the betrayed. We are even startled to discover those voices dueling within one individual’s own private hell.

http://www.truthdig.com/arts_culture/item/iraq_and_afghanistan_on_stage_20110901/

View ACTS OF WAR at Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/dp/0810127326/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_til?tag=stagvoic-20&camp=14573&creative=327641&linkCode=as1&creativeASIN=0810127326&adid=1K4GZPE8XWER9XHMJ7CD&