Monthly Archives: July 2015

RORY KINNEAR, ANTONY SHER AND RICHARD MCCABE ON THE EVIL IN IAGO ·

  

(Matt Trueman’s article appeared in the Guardian, 7/28.)

Rory Kinnear (National Theatre, 2013)

With a lot of Shakespeare’s characters, something seismic has happened to them just before we meet them. Hamlet has lost his father. Angelo jilts Mariana in Measure for Measure. Iago suspects that Othello has slept with his wife. As an actor, you have to know who that character was beforehand in order to understand how they’ve changed.

Iago was a good egg: a company man, well-liked by the squaddies, funny, kind and generous. However, we meet a man who feels cuckolded. He’s not sure if it’s absolutely true, but he’s heard a whisper on the grapevine.

http://www.theguardian.com/stage/2015/jul/28/rory-kinnear-antony-sher-richard-mccabe-iago-othello

Stage Voices Publishing for archived posts and sign up for free e-mail updates: http 2015:// www.stagevoices.com/ . If you would like to contribute a review, monologue, or other work related to theatre, please write to Bob Shuman at Bobjshuman@gmail.com.

CLIFFORD ODETS: ‘AWAKE AND SING’ (REVIEW PICK, NY) ·

(Laura Collins-Hughes’s article appeared in The New York Times, 7/20; via Pam Green.)

The tension around Bessie Berger’s dining room table is so close to the boiling point, you can practically see the steam rising. Her son, Ralph, is venting about wasting his life as a stock clerk. His combative sister, Hennie, is mocking their placid dad. So Bessie, a steamroller of a woman and a lifelong enforcer of her own will, does what she needs to do to shut them up. She feigns weakness from emotional upset. “In a minute I’ll get up from the table,” she says. “I can’t take a bite in my mouth no more.”

What Bessie does not yet understand, in the opening scene of Clifford Odets’s Depression-era drama “Awake and Sing!” — handsomely mounted by the National Asian American Theater Company, at the Public Theater — is just how eager her two 20-something children are for a jailbreak from their stifled existence. She’s raised them to be smarter, fiercer and less obedient than she thinks.

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/07/21/theater/review-awake-and-sing-a-depression-era-family-drama.html?_r=0

Stage Voices Publishing for archived posts and sign up for free e-mail updates: http 2015:// www.stagevoices.com/ . If you would like to contribute a review, monologue, or other work related to theatre, please write to Bob Shuman at Bobjshuman@gmail.com.

COLIN QUINN: ‘THE NEW YORK STORY’ (REVEW PICK, NY) ·

 

(Jason Zinoman’s article appeared in The New York Times, 7/25; via Pam Green.)

When I worked at Time Out New York in the late 1990s, visitors to the office were greeted by an ad poster saying: “Welcome to New York. Now Get Out.”

It made me roll my eyes. That the famously obnoxious New York attitude was being used to sell magazines was, to a snarky young guy steeped in the cultural critiques of The Baffler, just one more example of the Disney takeover of the city. Just as theater is always dying, New York is perpetually over. Complaining about its demise, however, remains one of its wonderful traditions, and Colin Quinn, a comic alert to ritual, plants himself firmly in the middle of it in his new monologue, “The New York Story,” a nostalgic lament that makes for a lovely summer evening.

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/07/24/theater/review-colin-quinn-full-of-nostalgia-for-gritty-old-new-york.html?_r=0

Stage Voices Publishing for archived posts and sign up for free e-mail updates: http 2015:// www.stagevoices.com/ . If you would like to contribute a review, monologue, or other work related to theatre, please write to Bob Shuman at Bobjshuman@gmail.com.

‘THE NEW YORKER’ THEATRE LISTINGS, 8/3 PLAYDECK ·

Openings and Previews

Cymbeline

Delacorte

Daniel Sullivan's production, the second free Shakespeare in the Park offering of the summer, features Lily Rabe, Hamish Linklater, and Raúl Esparza. In previews. Opens Aug. 10.

Get Tickets

Informed Consent

The Duke on 42nd Street

Deborah Zoe Laufer's play, presented by Primary Stages, was inspired by a court case in which the Havasupai Tribe claimed that researchers from Arizona State University used their DNA samples improperly. In previews. Opens Aug. 18.

Get Tickets

John

Pershing Square Signature Center

Sam Gold directs a new play by Annie Baker ("The Flick"), set in a bed-and-breakfast in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. In previews. Opens Aug. 11.

Get Tickets

Whorl Inside a Loop

Second Stage

Sherie Rene Scott stars in a play she wrote with Dick Scanlan, about an actress teaching a storytelling class in a maximum-security prison. Scanlan and Michael Mayer direct. In previews.

Get Tickets

http://www.newyorker.com/goings-on-about-town/theatre

Stage Voices Publishing for archived posts and sign up for free e-mail updates: http 2015:// www.stagevoices.com/ . If you would like to contribute a review, monologue, or other work related to theatre, please write to Bob Shuman at Bobjshuman@gmail.com.

MARLON BRANDO’S PRIVATE AUDIOTAPES TELL THE STORY OF A MAN HAUNTED BY MEMORIES ·

 

(Susan King’s article appeared in the Los Angeles Times, 7/25; via the Drudge Report.)

"Listen to me, Marlon… This is one part of yourself speaking to another part of yourself. Listen to the sound of my voice and trust me. You know I have your interests at heart."

— Excerpt from a self-hypnosis tape recorded in 1996 by Marlon Brando

By any measure, Marlon Brando was one of the most influential actors in the history of cinema.

His powerful acting style and undeniable charisma have mesmerized generations of filmgoers, with unforgettable roles in such movies as "On the Waterfront," "A Streetcar Named Desire" and "The Godfather." A generation of American actors studied — if not actually copied — his every move on-screen. He was like no one else.

http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/classichollywood/la-ca-mn-classic-hollywood-marlon-brando-20150726-story.html#page=1 

Stage Voices Publishing for archived posts and sign up for free e-mail updates: http 2015:// www.stagevoices.com/ . If you would like to contribute a review, monologue, or other work related to theatre, please write to Bob Shuman at Bobjshuman@gmail.com.

‘THE KING AND I’: WHAT A 47-SECOND QUICK-CHANGE LOOKS LIKE ·

 

(Erin Privratsky’s article was posted on Buzzfeed, 6/12; via Pam Green.)

Live performances, especially in theatre, are enhanced by the ability of actors to quickly and seamlessly transition between scenes. Oftentimes a new scene represents a change in location, or perhaps several years pass in the blink of an eye. At the 2015 Tony Awards, Kelli O’Hara allowed the documentation of what a quick-change looks like backstage – and the army it takes to pull it off successfully. Watch this amazing clip of what it takes to instantly change the mood and theme of a show from the Tony Awards performance from The King and I. Watch it below the jump!

http://the-daily.buzz/what-a-47-second-quick-change-looks-like/?ts_pid=2&ts_pid=2

Stage Voices Publishing for archived posts and sign up for free e-mail updates: http 2015:// www.stagevoices.com/ . If you would like to contribute a review, monologue, or other work related to theatre, please write to Bob Shuman at Bobjshuman@gmail.com.

WATCH CHEEK BY JOWL’S ‘UBU ROI’–LIVE STREAM BEGINS 7PM (ENGLAND), 2PM (EST-NEW YORK), SUNDAY, 7/26/15 (LINK BELOW) ·

 

(Jonathan McAloon’s article appeared in the Telegraph, 7/20.)

LIVE STREAM BEGINS 7PM (ENGLAND), 2PM (EST-NEW YORK), 7/26/15

Declan Donnellan’s 'crisply entertaining' production, broadcast from New York, is available to watch on demand on July 26th at 7pm

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/theatre/11741378/watch-cheek-by-jowls-ubu-roi.html

Stage Voices Publishing for archived posts and sign up for free e-mail updates: http 2015:// www.stagevoices.com/ . If you would like to contribute a review, monologue, or other work related to theatre, please write to Bob Shuman at Bobjshuman@gmail.com.

ALFRED JARRY: ‘UBU ROI’ FROM CHEEK BY JOWL (REVIEW PICK, NY) ·

(Ben Brantley’s article appeared in The New York Times, 7/23.)

Vive l’adolescence! The spirit of rancorous rebellion that rumbles within every teenager is storming the bourgeois barricades in Cheek by Jowl’s inspired rethinking of Alfred Jarry’s “Ubu Roi,” the satirical drama that once rattled Paris to its foundations, which runs through Sunday at the Gerald W. Lynch Theater as part of the Lincoln Center Festival.

Though this flamboyantly vicious play first opened in the late 19th century, contemporary parents will find much to disturb them in its portrait of a murderous Macbeth-like monarch and his fiendish queen. Not that Mom and Dad are likely to identify directly with these filthy (rich and otherwise) royals.(Read more)

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/07/24/theater/review-ubu-roi-mom-and-dads-party-of-grown-up-grotesques.html?rref=theater&module=Ribbon&version=context&region=Header&action=click&contentCollection=Theater&pgtype=article

Stage Voices Publishing for archived posts and sign up for free e-mail updates: http 2015:// www.stagevoices.com/ . If you would like to contribute a review, monologue, or other work related to theatre, please write to Bob Shuman at Bobjshuman@gmail.com.

JOHN RUBINSTEIN’S JOURNEY FROM SON TO FATHER IN ‘PIPPIN’ ·

 

(Hedy Weiss’s article appeared in the Chicago Sun-time, 7/23.)

John Rubinstein was 26 when he made his Broadway debut and created the title role in the original 1972 production of “Pippin” — a somewhat unconventional musical for its time, that featured a score by a very young Stephen Schwartz (who would pen “Wicked” nearly three decades later), a book by Roger O. Hirson, and show-defining direction and choreography by Bob Fosse.

http://entertainment.suntimes.com/stage/john-rubinsteins-journey-son-father-pippin/

Stage Voices Publishing for archived posts and sign up for free e-mail updates: http 2015:// www.stagevoices.com/ . If you would like to contribute a review, monologue, or other work related to theatre, please write to Bob Shuman at Bobjshuman@gmail.com.

AL PACINO: “WHAT’S THE POINT OF QUITTING?” ·

(Henry Barnes’s  appeared in the Guardian, 7/23.)

In 2011, Al Pacino roasted himself. In the Adam Sandler comedy Jack & Jill, he falls for the twin sister of a Los Angeles advertising executive (Sandler), the buxom, boorish Bronxite Jill (also Sandler). Pacino plays himself as a sell-out and a creep, mocking the roles that made him famous by rapping for Dunkin’ Donuts coffee (“You want creamy goodness? I’m your friend. Say hello to my chocolate blend”), carelessly allowing his Oscar to be smashed while trying to impress Jill during an impromptu game of stickball. He is befuddled, paranoid, pretentious and hopeless. He’s confused by LA and adrift within his own celebrity.

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2015/jul/23/al-pacino-whats-the-point-of-quitting