Monthly Archives: August 2012

MARVIN HAMLISCH, REST IN PEACE (1944-2012) ·

  

(Brent Lang’s article appeared in The Wrap, 7/7.)

Hamlisch composed music for more than 40 motion picture, including his Oscar-winning score and song for “The Way We Were,” and his adaptation of Scott Joplin’s ragtime music for “The Sting,” for which he received a third Oscar.

His musical scores, though intricately conceived, never drew attention to themselves. They served to complement the on-screen action, not overwhelm it — enhancing each gesture, each glance, each moment of drama. That subtle approach allowed him to be something of a musical chameleon, easily gliding from searing dramas to off-beat comedies and making him a close collaborator to a diverse group of directors, such as Woody Allen, Steven Soderbergh and Alan J. Pakula.

http://www.thewrap.com/movies/column-post/marvin-hamlisch-oscar-winning-composer-dies-68-50971

‘NEW YORKER’ THEATRE LISTINGS, AUGUST 13 & 20 PLAYDECK ·

 

OPENINGS AND PREVIEWS

Event: Bring It On: The Musical

Venue: St. James Theatre

Lin-Manuel Miranda, Tom Kitt, Jeff Whitty, and Amanda Green wrote this musical . . .

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Event: Bullet for Adolf

Venue: New World Stages

A budding friendship between two Midwesterners and a slick New Yorker is . . .

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Event: Chaplin

Venue: Ethel Barrymore Theatre

A musical about the life of Charlie Chaplin (Rob McClure), with music . . .

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Event: Children of Hercules

Venue: Various locations

American Thymele Theatre stages free productions of the Euripides tragedy in theatres . . .

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Event: Forbidden Broadway: Alive and Kicking

Venue: 47th Street Theater

The Broadway shows spoofed in the latest installment of this musical satire . . .

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Event: FringeNYC

Venue: Various locations

The sixteenth annual New York International Fringe Festival presents nearly two hundred . . .

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Event: Harrison, TX: Three Plays by Horton Foote

Venue: 59E59 Theatres

Primary Stages begins its season with a trio of short plays that . . .

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FLORENCE WAREN, REST IN PEACE (1917-2012) ·

 

(Denise Grady’s article appeared in The New York Times, 8/4.)

Even in the depths of war in occupied France, Florence Waren and Frederic Apcar — or “Florence et Frederic,” as they were billed — dazzled Paris, he in tails, she in jeweled gowns with flowers in her hair, the two of them gliding and swirling across the stage as one of the most famous
ballroom-dance teams in Europe.

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/08/05/world/europe/florence-waren-dancer-who-resisted-nazis-dies-at-95.html?pagewanted=1&hpw

JUSTICE RUTH BADER GINSBURG WEIGHS LEGAL LESSONS OF OPERA ·

(Jason Keyer’s AP article appeared 8/3; via The Drudge Report.)

It turns out lawyers and opera singers have more in common than booming voices and a love of melodrama.Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is among the jurists who have looked for legal lessons in arias, and she got a chance Friday to indulge both passions at the American Bar Association's annual meeting in Chicago.

http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/U/US_LAW_AND_OPERA?SITE=AP&SECTION=HOME&TEMPLATE=DEFAULT&CTIME=2012-08-03-19-27-15

*NY FRINGE FESTIVAL* CASANDRA VICTORIA CHOPOURIAN/GARY HEIDT: ‘SHELLY’S SPHERICAL JOURNEY’ (AUG 11, 12, 18, 20) ·

(from Gary Heidt)

In SHELLY'S SPHERICAL JOURNEY, Cassandra Victoria Chopourian creates the wacky, big-hearted but impulsively pyromaniacal character of Shelly.  Shelly is sick of running the motel she inherited and feels like her life is a dead end.  So she burns it down and goes on the road, but it's less Thelma and Louise and more Beckett meets Bugs Bunny when every single thing goes wrong.  She ends up back where she started, worse off but wiser–now instead of owning a motel, she works as a maid at a big chain hotel.

There's a lot of really sweet music by a great band and singers, great dancing.  Rehearsals have been full of laughter and tears.  SHELLY'S SPHERICAL JOURNEY is funny and goofy and silly but it's also deeply moving.  There are all kinds of narrative and critical levels going on talking about what home is, about ethnicity, class, freedom and free doom, and circularity, recurrence, transmutation.

Just right for today.

Tickets are already on sale online!  We want to encourage people to come to

OPENING MATINEE on Saturday August 11 at 2 PM.  But there are 4 other performances as well.

http://www.ticketweb.com/t3/sale/SaleEventDetail?dispatch=loadSelectionData&pl=fringenyc&eventId=4747445

But there are 4 other performances in August as well.

Sat 11 @ 2  Sun 12 @ 9  Sat 18 @ 2*  Mon 20 @ 7  Sun 26 @ 12 

All take place at La MaMa's First Floor Theater, 74A East 4th Street

(2nd Avenue & Bowery)

SIMON STEPHENS: ‘THE CURIOUS INCIDENT OF THE DOG IN THE NIGHT-TIME’ (REVIEW PICK, UK) ·

(Laura Thompson’s article appeared in the Telegraph, 8/3.)

Mark Haddon’s 2003 novel, The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time, is one of those rare good books that has transcended the tight little world of 'literature’. But can it become a play? It is the first-person narrative of Christopher Boone, a 15-year-old maths genius with 'behavioural
problems’ and a relentlessly singular view of reality. Surely such a novel, characterised by its highly remarkable sole viewpoint, is precisely the wrong material for the polyphonic world of the stage?

Not so. This adaptation by the acclaimed playwright Simon Stephens is intensely, innately theatrical; it is also funny and extremely moving. In the manner of the RSC’s legendary Nicholas Nickleby, it sets the constancy of the text – from which the actors quote – against the agile conjuring of the here-and-now. There is a framing device of sorts, wherein Christopher is encouraged by a teacher to turn his narrative into a school play; in a sense, therefore, he is directing the 'cast’. But this concept is not laboured, and indeed the entire production is characterised by a breathless fluidity that is
emotional rather than cerebral.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/theatre/theatre-reviews/9450156/The-Curious-Incident-of-the-Dog-in-the-Night-Time-adapted-by-Simon-Stephens-Cottesloe-Theatre-review.html

GORE VIDAL, REST IN PEACE (1925-2012) ·

(Charles McGrath’s article appeared in The New York Times, 8/1.)

Gore Vidal, the elegant, acerbic all-around man of letters who presided with a certain relish over what he declared to be the end of American civilization, died on Tuesday at his home in the Hollywood Hills section of Los Angeles, where he moved in 2003, after years of living in Ravello, Italy. He was 86.

The cause was complications of pneumonia, his nephew Burr Steers said by telephone.

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/08/01/books/gore-vidal-elegant-writer-dies-at-86.html?_r=1&pagewanted=all