Monthly Archives: May 2012

OBIE WINNERS 2012 (FULL LIST) ·

 

 

(From Gail Parenteau / Parenteau Guidance)

 

For more information, please visit: http://obies.villagevoice.com/2012/

2012 VILLAGE VOICE OBIE AWARDS WINNERS ANNOUNCED

New York, NY — May 21, 2012 — The 57th Annual Obie

 

4000 Miles by Amy Herzog received the Obie Award for Best New American Play, which is accompanied by a $1,000 prize. Caridad Svich—a playwright, translator, and teacher—received the Obie Award for Lifetime Achievement. A complete list of awards is given below.

 

Best New American Play (with $1,000 prize)

Amy Herzog

4000 Miles (Lincoln Center Theater)

 

Performance

Cherise Boothe

Milk Like Sugar (Playwrights Horizons and the Women's Project)

Steven Boyer

Hand to God (Ensemble Studio Theatre/Youngblood)

Sweet and Sad Ensemble:

Jon DeVries, Shuler Hensley, Maryann Plunkett, Laila Robins, Jay O. Sanders, J. Smith-Cameron (The Public Theater)

Gabriel Ebert and Mary Louise Wilson

4000 Miles (Lincoln Center Theater)

Jim Fletcher

Sustained Excellence

Santino Fontana

Sons of the Prophet (The Roundabout Theatre)

Linda Lavin

The Lyons (The Vineyard Theatre)

Susan Pourfar

Tribes (Barrow Street Theatre)

 

Playwriting

Kirsten Greenidge

Milk Like Sugar (Playwrights Horizons and the Women's Project)

 

Direction

Richard Maxwell

Early Plays (The Wooster Group and St. Ann's Warehouse)

Jay Scheib

World of Wires (The Kitchen)

 

Design

Mark Barton, Sustained Excellence of Lighting Design

Mimi Lien, Sustained Excellence of Set Design

Matt Tierney and Ben Williams, sound design

The Select (The Sun Also Rises) (New York Theatre Workshop)

 

Special Citations

Mark Bennett, Denis O'Hare, Lisa Peterson, and Stephen Spinella

An Iliad (New York Theatre Workshop)

Elevator Repair Service

Sustained Excellence

Erin Courtney and Ken Rus Schmoll

A Map of Virtue (13P)

Steven Hoggett, Martin Lowe, and John Tiffany

Once (New York Theatre Workshop)

Daniel Kitson

It's Always Right Now, Until It's Later (St. Ann's Warehouse)

Ethan Lipton & His Orchestra

No Place to Go (The Public Theater/Joe's Pub)

Ross Wetzsteon Grant ($1,000)

Youngblood (Ensemble Studio Theatre)

 

Grants

The Bushwick Starr ($2,500)

The Debate Society ($2,500)

Lifetime Achievement

Caridad Svich

 

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WILL ENO: ‘TITLE AND DEED’ (REVIEW PICK, NY) ·

 

(Charles Isherwood’s article appeared in The New York Times, 5/20.)

We are all embarked upon a strange, aimless journey from nowhere to nowhere — or to put it a bit more cheerily, from somewhere to somewhere else — according to the friendly sojourner in Will Eno’s “Title and Deed,” a haunting and often fiercely funny meditation on life as a state of permanent exile, performed by the marvelous Irish actor Conor Lovett.

http://theater.nytimes.com/2012/05/21/theater/reviews/title-and-deed-by-will-eno-with-conor-lovett.html?adxnnl=1&hpw=&adxnnlx=1337647173-rpYtJqkIIauZlHDwXPmL7w

‘NEW YORKER’ THEATRE LISTINGS, 5/28 PLAYDECK ·

THE BAD GUYS

Second Stage Theatre Uptown presents a comedy by Alena Smith, in which a group of childhood friends reunite for a summer barbecue. Directed by Hal Brooks. In previews. (McGinn/Cazale, 2162 Broadway, at 76th St. 212-246-4422.) 

CHIMICHANGAS AND ZOLOFT

The Atlantic Theatre Company presents Fernanda Coppel’s play, in which a woman goes on a bender after her fortieth birthday. Directed by Jaime Castañeda. Previews begin May 23. (Atlantic Stage 2, at 330 W. 16th St. 212-279-4200.)

THE COMMON PURSUIT

The Roundabout presents a play by Simon Gray, which follows a group of six friends through twenty years of their lives, from college to middle age. Moisés Kaufman directs. In previews. Opens May 24. (Laura Pels, 111 W. 46th St. 212-719-1300.)

EMPIRE

The Spiegeltent, an ornate early-twentieth-century Belgian pavilion, returns with this new attraction, featuring circus, cabaret, and burlesque acts. In previews. (Spiegelworld, 265 W. 45th St. 212-239-6200.)

FOOD AND FADWA

Lameece Issaq and Jacob Kader wrote this drama, about a young Palestinian woman whose love of cooking is set against the political turmoil of the West Bank. Shana Gold directs. In previews. (New York Theatre Workshop, 79 E. 4th St. 212-279-4200.)


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ARNOLD WESKER: ‘CHICKEN SOUP WITH BARLEY’ (NOW ON BBC RADIO 3 UNTIL 5/27—LINK BELOW) ·

A chance to hear a transfer to radio of The Royal Court Theatre's acclaimed 2011 production of Arnold Wesker's landmark play from 1958 that captures the collapse of an ideology, alongside the disintegration of a family.

Arnold Wesker celebrates his 80th birthday this month and this is one of the plays that made him a leading voice of 1960s "kitchen sink" British drama.

The kettle boils in 1936 as the fascists are marching. Tea is brewed in 1946, with disillusion in the air at the end of the war. Twenty years on in 1956, as rumours spread of Hungarian revolution, the cup is empty.

LISTEN AT: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b01hq27w

Sarah Kahn, an East End Jewish mother, is a feisty political fighter and a staunch communist. Battling against the State and her shirking husband she desperately tries to keep her family together.

This landmark state-of-the-nation play is a panoramic drama portraying the age-old battle between realism and idealism.

Cast
Sarah Kahn Samantha Spiro
Harry Kahn Danny Webb
Monty Blatt Harry Peacock
Dave Simmonds Nitzan Sharron
Prince Silver Rene Zagger
Hymie Kossof Steve Furst
Cissie Kahn Alexis Zegerman
Ada Kahn Jenna Augen
Ronnie Kahn Tom Rosenthal
Bessie Blatt Rebecca Gethings

Chicken Soup with Barley is a Royal Court Theatre production and was directed for the stage in 2011 by Dominic Cooke, and for radio by Simon Godwin, and produced for BBC Radio 3 by Catherine Bailey.

ARNOLD WESKER: WHY YOU NEVER SAW THE BEST PLAY OF THE SEVENTIES ·

(Matthew Sweet's article appeared in the Telegraph, 5/16.)

'The day of the newspaper mogul is over… how can you take a moral position if you start invading people’s privacy?” These words might come from the Leveson Inquiry: a poison arrow shot by Robert Jay into the heart of some squirming hack. They are, however, lines from The Journalists — a landmark play about press ethics commissioned 40 years ago by the Royal Shakespeare Company, which hailed it as the greatest play of the Seventies.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/theatre/theatre-features/9270517/Arnold-Wesker-Did-Trotskyists-kill-off-the-best-Seventies-play.html

MIKE BARTLETT: ‘COCKFIGHT PLAY’ (REVIEW PICK, NY) ·

(Ben Brantley’s article appeared in The New York Times, 5/17.)

“Cockfight Play” is not the title of the terrific, tense little comedy by Mike Bartlett that opened on Thursday night at the Duke on 42nd Street. Its real name, which is only one syllable, is unprintable here, and “Cockfight Play” is being used in advertisements in family newspapers.

Yet there is occasionally truth in even the subterfuges of advertising. And as it happens, the publicized title is an accurate description for the experience of this feisty, hypnotic and oddly energizing exercise in emotional carnage, which has been directed (by James Macdonald) and acted (by a four-member ensemble) with a brute focus that suggests to-the-death battles of penned animals.

http://theater.nytimes.com/2012/05/18/theater/reviews/cockfight-play-directed-by-james-macdonald-at-the-duke.html?hpw

‘THE TWO GENTLEMEN OF VERONA’–WITH TWO ACTORS (REVIEW PICK, UK) ·

(Alex Needham’s article appeared in the Guardian, 5/14.)

What is probably Shakespeare's first play is not frequently performed – it was once on an RSC list of works believed to be guaranteed to lose money – so staging it in Shona, spoken in Zimbabwe, with a cast of two seems particularly brave, at least on paper. In practice, this version, by London-based company Two Gents and first staged in 2008, is uproariously entertaining, even when the gags in Shona are busily sailing over your head, and is obviously adored by a vocal Globe audience, including a sizeable Zimbabwean contingent whose members at some points scream with glee. It's a rare and probably salutory experience for white, middle-class theatregoers to feel as if they're the only ones not in on the joke.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/stage/2012/may/14/the-two-gentlemen-of-verona-review

EDITH WHARTON/CLYDE FITCH: ‘THE HOUSE OF MIRTH’ (REVIEW PICK, NY) ·

(Michael Feingold’s article appeared in the Village Voice, 5/16.)

Even 107 years ago, entertainment producers' eyes lit up at the thought of getting their hands on a bestselling novel, and the Broadway eminence Charles Frohman must have thought he'd hit the jackpot when he acquired the rights to Edith Wharton's The House of Mirth (1905), as dramatized by Mrs. Wharton herself, in collaboration with the era's go-to guy for commercial play construction, Clyde Fitch.

(Read more)

 

http://www.villagevoice.com/2012-05-16/theater/the-house-of-mirth-mrs-wharton-s-business-school/

 

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MARK RAVENHILL: ‘pool (no water)’ (REVIEW PICK, NY) ·

(Charles Isherwood’s article appeared in The New York Times, 5/14.)

Oh, to be a young artist, brimming with confidence, passion and a desire to remake the world by making beautiful things.

Bang! Oh, dear. Ten years have passed. The breaks haven’t come, the world is the same as it ever was, and the gritty glamour of la vie bohème has subsided into the numbing drudgery of scraping by on no money while battling substance abuse.

Worse yet, that great friend and colleague, the one whose work you secretly dissed, has made it big. Really big. She’s moved to the land of palm trees, sells to all the big collectors and has even got a pool in the backyard of her lavish house.

(Read more)

 

http://theater.nytimes.com/2012/05/15/theater/reviews/pool-no-water-by-mark-ravenhill-at-the-9th-space.html?adxnnl=1&hpw=&adxnnlx=1337124390-1C4n5VUtm5044Fm2Rp2tdg

 

(The clip below, not from 'pool (no water)', shows Ravenhill reciting his sonnet written for Shakespeare's 448th birthday and the opening of Britain's World Shakespeare Festival.)

 

 

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‘NEW YORKER’ THEATRE LISTINGS, 5/21 PLAYDECK ·

 

COCK 

The Royal Court produced this play by Mike Bartlett, directed by James Macdonald, about a man who breaks up with his boyfriend and falls in love with a woman. In previews. Opens May 17. (The Duke on 42nd Street, 229 W. 42nd St. 646-223-3010.)

 

THE COMMON PURSUIT

The Roundabout presents a play by Simon Gray, which follows a group of six friends through twenty years of their lives, from college to middle age. Moisés Kaufman directs. In previews. (Laura Pels, 111 W. 46th St. 212-719-1300.)

 

FEBRUARY HOUSE

Gabriel Kahane wrote the music and lyrics and Seth Bockley wrote the book for this new musical, set in a Brooklyn boarding house that became a bohemian commune for artists. In previews. Opens May 22. (Public, 425 Lafayette St. 212-967-7555.)

 

FOOD AND FADWA

Lameece Issaq and Jacob Kader wrote this drama, about a young Palestinian woman whose love of cooking is set against the political turmoil of the West Bank. Shana Gold directs. Previews begin May 18. (New York Theatre Workshop, 79 E. 4th St. 212-279-4200.)

 

MEDIEVAL PLAY

The première of a comedy by Kenneth Lonergan (“This Is Our Youth”), in which two French knights set out on a moral quest during the Papal Schism of 1378. The cast includes Tate Donovan and Josh Hamilton. In previews. (Pershing Square Signature Center, 480 W. 42nd St. 212-244-7529.)

 

MY CHILDREN! MY AFRICA!

Signature Theatre Company presents Athol Fugard’s 1989 play, about an idealistic teacher in South Africa who forms a student debate team. Ruben Santiago-Hudson directs. In previews. (Pershing Square Signature Center, 480 W. 42nd St. 212-244-7529.)

 

OLD JEWS TELLING JOKES

Peter Gethers and Daniel Okrent, the former public editor of the Times, created this revue of Jewish humor, inspired by the Web site oldjewstellingjokes.com. Marc Bruni directs. In previews. Opens May 20. (Westside, 407 W. 43rd St. 212-239-6200.)

 

POTTED POTTER

Daniel Clarkson and Jefferson Turner perform a two-man parody of all seven “Harry Potter” books, condensed into seventy minutes. Previews begin May 19. (Little Shubert, 422 W. 42nd St. 212-239-6200.)

 

RAPTURE, BLISTER, BURN

Playwrights Horizons premières a play by Gina Gionfriddo (“Becky Shaw”), about two friends from grad school, a successful author and a stay-at-home mom, who envy each other’s lives. Peter DuBois directs. Previews begin May 18. (416 W. 42nd St. 212-279-4200.)

 

STOREFRONT CHURCH

Atlantic Theatre Company presents the final installment of John Patrick Shanley’s “Church and State” trilogy, which began with “Doubt.” Giancarlo Esposito plays a Bronx borough president who clashes with a local minister. In previews. (336 W. 20th St. 212-279-4200.)

 

TITLE AND DEED

The U.S. première of a play by Will Eno, about a traveller looking for connection in a far-off country. Directed by Judy Hegarty Lovett. In previews. Opens May 20. (Pershing Square Signature Center, 480 W. 42nd St. 212-244-7529.)

Read more http://www.newyorker.com/arts/events/theatre/2012/05/21/120521goth_GOAT_theatre#ixzz1uwQ53grn

 

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