Monthly Archives: July 2009

WON’T YOU COME BACK, KANDER & EBB, KANDER & EBB? ·

(Michael Riedel's article appeared in The New York Post, 7/31.)

'BOYS' ARE BACK IN TOWN

KANDER AND EBB FINALE GETS EARLY RAVE

FRED Ebb, the great lyricist of "Chicago" and "Cabaret," died in 2004.

But he left several unfinished shows at which his longtime writing partner, composer John Kander, kept plugging away.

There was "All About Us," which opened at the Westport Country Playhouse in 2007. It had some good songs, but it wasn't top-drawer Kander and Ebb, and it never left Connecticut.

More enjoyable was the musical mystery thriller "Curtains."

Starring David Hyde Pierce, it was nominated for several Tony Awards in 2007.

But it seems that Kander has saved the best show for last.

(Read more)

http://www.nypost.com/seven/07312009/entertainment/theater/boys_are_back_in_town_182160.htm

TKTS THROUGH TKTS ·

(Erik Piepenburg's article appeared in The New York Times, August 29.)

Broadway Bargains: Secrets of the TKTS Booth

Some people like to plan their theatergoing well in advance; others, especially these days, are more interested in a bargain. The TKTS booth is often the first stop for those seeking reduced-price seats to a Broadway show. The booth in the theater district, at a newly refurbished location in Duffy Square, is a relatively quick and convenient place to score tickets. (An interactive feature on the new Times Square booth is here.)

But what about the long lines? How do you know if a show is worth the money? Can’t this be done on an iPhone? And why aren’t there ever any tickets to “Wicked”?

http://artsbeat.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/07/29/broadway-bargains-secrets-of-the-tkts-booth/?hpw

A NEW BLANCHE: RACHEL WEISZ JOINS THE ‘STREETCAR’ PANTHEON ·

(Benedict Nightingale's review appeared in The Times of London, July 29.)

A Streetcar Named Desire, Donmar, WC2

Let me be ungentlemanly enough to be gentlemanly about Rachel Weisz. Her performance as the cracked belle at the centre of Tennessee Williams’s great play is so impressive that I must point out that in one vital respect she’s miscast. Why does her Blanche DuBois feel impelled to hide her age and her looks from anyone, least of all the nice but dim suitor played by Barnaby Kay? Even when she’s clinging precariously to the remnants of her sanity this gorgeous, gifted actress is a bright light in a dark world.

Yet, really, why not? Blanche is in flight from everything: the loss of the family mansion pointedly called Belle Reve, the memory of her marriage to a suicidal gay man, her desperate nymphomania, small-town scandal, the loss of her job as a teacher, more. No wonder Weisz comes to her sister’s grotty New Orleans apartment so exhausted her face is almost more ashen than her dress, which is actually pure white.

(Read more)

http://entertainment.timesonline.co.uk/tol/arts_and_entertainment/stage/theatre/article6731282.ece

 

DUO!: THE BEST SCENES FOR TWO FOR THE 21ST CENTURY–IN STOCK AT AMAZON AND FINE STORES NOW (OFFICIAL PUB DATE 8/15/09) ·

DUO!: THE BEST SCENES FOR TWO FOR THE 21ST CENTURY

 

Spotlighting the best of Broadway, Off-Broadway, regional, and experimental writings since 2000, Duo! offers strong dramatic pieces for performance and study. Culled from the work of over one hundred playwrights—veterans as well as up-and-coming talents—this follow-up compendium to the popular edition of the 1990s is by turns comic, serious, or both, but always intensely human.

Filled with rich characters and universal storylines, Duo! speaks to people of all ages and backgrounds and tackles all the paramount issues of our time—from race and gender to class and politics to love and sex. Tracy Letts confronts the aftermath of betrayal on a night too hot for sleep in August: Osage County; Karen Finley exposes sexual politics outside the Oval Office in George & Martha; Lynn Nottage delineates gentility, the fear of being alone, and the passage of time in Intimate Apparel; Richard Greenberg weighs the costs of being godly or becoming merely human in the baseball-themed Take Me Out; and Tina Howe bends time, showing the universal power of dramatic recognition across the ages, in Water Music.

 

The table of contents:

 

SCENES FOR A MAN AND A WOMAN

T H E A LT R U I S T S by Nicky Silver

AUGUST: O S A G E C O U N T Y by Tracy Letts

“ B E N C H S E AT ” F R O M

A U T O B A H N by Neil LaBute

THE AUTOMATA P I E TA by Constance Congdon

BLACK THANG by Ato Essandoh

D E A D M A N ’ S C E L L P H O N E by Sarah Ruhl

D E V E L O P I N G I N A

D A R K R O O M by Joseph Catalfano

E C S TAT I C S TAT E S by Juliana Francis Kelly

ELEPHANT by Margie Stokley

E L L I O T, A S O L D I E R ’ S

F U G U E by Quiara Alegría Hudes

ERRAT I C A by Reina Hardy

E X P E C T I N G I S A B E L by Lisa Loomer

FORCE CONTINUUM by Kia Corthron

FREEDOM HIGH by Adam Kraar

GAP by Carol S. Lashof

GEORGE & MARTHA by Karen Finley

T H E G R A N D D E S I G N by Susan Miller

GROUNDWORK OF THE META P H Y S I C

OF MORALS by Young Jean Lee

HENRY by Claudia Barnett

T H E I M P O S S I B I L I T Y O F M O S T

T H I N G S by Albert Innaurato

T H E L A S T F R E A K S H O W by Philip Zwerling

L E F T by Laura Henry

L E T I T G O by Crystal Field

MAGGIE MAY by Tom O’Brien

M A R E ’ S N E S T by Joseph Goodrich

T H E M E R C Y S E AT by Neil LaBute

M R . L U C K Y ’ S by Stephen Fife

ORSON’S SHADOW by Austin Pendleton

O U R L A D Y O F 1 2 1 S T

S T R E E T by Stephen Adly Guirgis

PA R A D I S E by Glyn O’Malley

PA R A D I S E PARK by Charles Mee

PERSEPHONE UNDERGROUND by Carol S. Lashof

PROPHECY by Karen Malpede

REBEL MOON by Brian Granger

R E D L I G H T W I N T E R by Adam Rapp

S C E N E S F R O M A N U N F I N I S H E D

 L I F E by Leigh Kennicott

S C R I P T E D by Mark Harvey Levine

S H Y N E S S I S N I C E by Marc Spitz

S O M E G I R L ( s ) by Neil LaBute

S O M E G I R L ( s ) by Neil LaBute

SOUND by Robert Patrick

S O U V E N I R by Stephen Temperly

S O U V E N I R by Stephen Temperly

STUFF HAPPENS by David Hare

T H E Y ’ R E J U S T L I K E

U S by Boo Killebrew

V- E D AY by Faye Sholiton

WA I T I N G by Lisa Soland

WAT E R M U S I C by Tina Howe

WOMAN KILLER by Chiori Miyagawa

WTC VIEW by Brian Sloan

 

SCENES FOR TWO WOMEN

A G E O F A R O U S A L by Linda Griffiths

A L L T H I N G S B E I N G E Q U A L by Faye Sholiton

A M E R I C A N T E T by Lydia Stryk

A M S T E L I N T E L AV I V by Allyson Currin

D E A D M A N ’ S C E L L P H O N E by Sarah Ruhl

D E D I C AT I O N O R T H E S T U F F O F

D R E A M S by Terrence McNally

T H E D I R E C T O R by Barbara Cassidy

DOUBT by John Patrick Shanley

T H E E L E K T R A F U G U E S by Ruth Margraff

E Y E S O F T H E H E A R T by Catherine Filloux

F O R E I G N B O D I E S by Susan Yankowitz

G R I E V I N G F O R

G E N E V I E V E by Kathleen Warnock

H O T E L S P L E N D I D by Lavonne Mueller

I N F I N I T E SPACE by Rob Handel

T H E I N T E L L I G E N T D E S I G N

O F J E N N Y

C H O W by Rolin Jones

I N T I M AT E A P PAREL by Lynn Nottage

K I S S A N D C RY by Tom Rowan

T H E L A N G U A G E O F

K I S S E S by Edmund De Santis

M E A S U R E F O R P L E A S U R E:

A RESTORATION ROMP by David Grimm

MISS WITHERSPOON by Christopher Durang

N I G H T T R A I N T O B O L I N A by Nilo Cruz

R A B B I T H O L E by David Lindsay-Abaire

S C E N E S F R O M A N U N

F I N I S H E D L I F E by Leigh Kennicott

SECOND. by Neal Utterback

S T I L L L I F E W I T H PARROT

& MONKEY by Paula Cizmar

T H I R D by Wendy Wasserstein

V- E D AY by Faye Sholiton

WRINKLES by Rebecca Basham

YOGA WA R R I O R by Katherine Burkman, Susie Gerald, Ann C. Hall, Deborah Burkman,

and Richard Esquinas

 

SCENES FOR TWO MEN

APPA R I T I O N by Anne Washburn

A U N T I E M AYHEM by David Pumo

T H E B AT T L E O F L I G H T

A N D D A R K N E S S by Stephen Fife

BETRAYED by George Packer

B’SHALOM by Meron Langsner

BURNING THE OLD MAN by Kelly McAllister

CAVEMAN by Richard Maxwell

C O R P S VALUES by Brendon Bates

DEWEY BOY & WOOKIE by Dwight Watson

END ZONE by Bob Shuman

“F L O AT I N G H O M E” F R O M

A N I N T I M AT E H I S T O R Y

O F E X I L E by Adrián Rodríguez

A FREE COUNTRY by Stephen Most

G O D ’ S E A R by Jenny Schwartz

H O U S E , D I V I D E D by Larry Loebell

I JUST WA N N A G E T T O

P H O E N I X by John Lane

I N D I A N B L O O D by A. R. Gurney

I S T H AT A G U N I N Y O U R

 P O C K E T by Carol Mullen

M E A S U R E F O R P L E A S U R E :

A RESTORATION

ROMP by David Grimm

OPUS by Michael Hollinger

ORSON’S SHADOW by Austin Pendleton

O U R L A D Y O F 1 2 1 S T

S T R E E T by Stephen Adly Guirgis

THE OVERWHELMING by J. T. Rogers

T H E PA R I S L E T T E R by Jon Robin Baitz

T H E P R I VAT E L I V E S

O F E S K I M O S by Ken Urban

R E A S O N S T O B E

P R E T T Y by Neil LaBute

REDEMPTION by Murray Schisgal

TA K E M E O U T by Richard Greenberg

TA K E M E O U T by Richard Greenberg

T I M E O U T by Erik Sherman

T H E W O M E N O F

L O C K E R B I E by Deborah Brevoort

T H E W R I T I N G O N T H E

WA L L by Ed Napier

Y O U A R E H E R E by Christina Anderson

 

ONE-ACTS FOR TWO

INTERREGNUM by William M. Hoffman

THE OTHER WOMAN by David Ives

 

 

Duo!

Duo! The Best Scenes for Two for the 21st Century

Joyce E. Henry, Ph. D., is professor emerita of Theatre and Communication Studies at Ursinus College. She is the editor of The Wisdom of Shakespeare and author of Beat the Bard. She lives in Collegeville, Pennsylvania.

Rebecca Dunn Jaroff, Ph. D., is assistant professor of English at Ursinus College, where she teaches American literature, drama, and journalism. She lives in Conshohocken, Pennsylvania.

Bob Shuman, M.F.A., is an editor, playwright, college professor, and co-author of Simply Elegant Flowers with Michael George. A Fellow of the Lark Theatre Company, he received Hunter College’s

Irv Zarkower Award for excellence in playwriting. He lives in New York City.

 

ISBN: 978-1-55783-702-8

HL00314752

www.applausepub.com

Edited by Joyce E. Henry, Rebecca Dunn Jaroff, and Bob Shuman

U.S. $18.99 Theatre / Acting and Auditioning

Go to AMAZON: http://www.amazon.com/Duo-Best-Scenes-21st-Century/dp/1557837023/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1248450432&sr=8-1

RECLAIMING THE NORWEGIAN: ‘HENRIK IBSEN AND THE BIRTH OF MODERNISM’ BY TORIL MOI (BOOK) ·

HENRICK IBSEN AND THE BIRTH OF MODERNISM

ART, THEATER, PHILOSOPHY 

 

By Toril Moi

 

416 pp. Oxford University Press. $ 29.95.  With illustrations and color plates.

I wrote about contemporary theatre’s resistance to realism in a review of Ian Rickson’s Broadway production of The Seagull in December.  Since then I’ve discovered a passionate, academic defense of Henrik Ibsen, written by Toril Moi, a Norwegian herself and the James B. Duke Professor of Literature and Romance Studies at Duke University, which takes up this issue with teeth: “I object to the understanding of realism that emerges from the ideology of modernism,” Moi writes. “In particular, I object to the idea that realism is a period of aesthetic naivety preceding modernism.” 

Let’s think about theatre in the 1950s:  Moi reminds us it was “the decade of Brecht, Beckett, Ionesco, and the angry young men.  It was a decade when theater people on the whole were happy to dismiss Ibsen (Kenneth Tynan was a great exception).  Michael Billington, the distinguished theater critic of the British Guardian, captures the attitude when he writes of a ‘caricature idea of [Ibsen’s] plays’, all too accurately summed up by Tyrone Guthrie in A Life in the Theatre (1959): ‘High thinking takes place in a world of dark-crimson serge tablecloths with chenille bobbles, black horsehair sofas, wall brackets and huge intellectual women in raincoats and rubbers.’ ”

In the U.S., I, additionally, think there was a reaction against the American realists (Williams and Inge come immediately to mind) of the ‘50s as they edged into a new decade with their keen interest in Freudian psychology. Realism was also seen on TV on Playhouse 90, for example, with works by Horton Foote, Tad Mosel, and William Gibson, to name three).  The problem wasn’t that new types of plays had emerged; rather, it was that realism was demoted in status as a style (except, interestingly, in terms of acting)–Williams unsuccessfully tried new concepts for the stage (Slapstick Tragedy (1966), In the Bar of a Tokyo Hotel (1969) but continued in a realistic vein for Hollywood, where it was supported and still is.  Inge convinced himself that he could no longer write and, ultimately in 1973, commit suicide. 

To think of American theater without its realists, however, by labeling the genre as “kitchen sink” or “TV writing,” is deleterious to our cultural inheritance.  It, specifically, erodes the importance of masterpieces like Long Day’s Journey Into Night and Death of a Salesman, aside from works by the aforementioned playwrights—and by emphasizing Albee, Ionesco, Pinter, and Kushner, theatrical models for new artists are limited. Perhaps the ‘60s were the natural breaking point for a new crop of playwrights to emerge influenced by the new ‘50s styles (with an “any friend of Ibsen is no friend of mine” attitude)—but it didn’t really mean that realism needed to be bad mouthed or sidelined.  As Moi explains in Henrik Ibsen and the Birth of Modernism, realism is not the enemy.  “Modernism is built on the negation of idealism”—not realism!  “Realism—the representation of reality in writing and art—is neither modernism’s opposite nor its historically necessary predecessor.  If any one entity occupies that position, it is idealism.”

In fact, as literary critic Fredric Jameson has argued, and with whom Moi concurs on a decisive point in the debate, “There is no modernist work, that doesn’t at the very least, have a ‘realist core.’” 

Ibsen actually tried to take up the banner of idealism (which was society’s approved literary form in the 1800s, meant to “uplift us, to point the way to the Ideal.”), but it straight jacketed the dramatist in early plays such as St. John’s Night and Lady Inger.  The five-hour epic Emperor and Galilean, transitioned Ibsen into a modernist.  The work that followed—including Ghosts, The Wild Duck, The Lady from the Sea, Hedda Gabler, The Master Builder, and so on–are the towering plays we give lip service to today, with a perfunctory reading of A Doll’s House somewhere along the line.  Moi, of course, is livid—and rightly so: “I cannot count the number of times otherwise well-read people have told me that they have never read and never bothered to see any plays by Ibsen, or that they haven’t read any since they were students. . . . In the Anglophone world it is still shameful for a literary critic to reveal that he or she knows nothing about Baudelaire and Flaubert.  why, then, are so many critics convinced that ignorance of Ibsen is just fine?”

Of course, with Ibsen there is also the issue of language to contend with.  Moi admits, “English-language readers and directors have sometimes found Ibsen’s prose plays excruciatingly pedestrian.  Like Arthur Miller, they feel that ‘Ibsen’s language, lyrical as it may sound in Scandinavia, does not sing in translation.’  I can understand this reaction, for translations of Ibsen often do make him sound flat-footed and boring.  But this is not always the translator’s fault.  My own struggles with Ibsen’s texts have taught me to respect the difficulties of the Ibsen translator.”  Yet, Moi does make the Ibsen translations throughout her book riveting and accessible.  She directly states that Rosmersholm is a masterpiece (the last New York production of this that I can recall was an English production at La Mama during the’80s).  I know teaching at Duke must have its many obligations, but, isn’t a new translation called for?

Fortunately, Harold Bloom also came to Ibsen’s defense in The Western Canon, but who is to make the case for O’Neill if realism continues to be dismissed? Especially, as we find out that he is a brother. 

© 2009 by Bob Shuman

GEORGE BERNARD SHAW: JOKE FOUND AFTER 79 YEARS ·

A handwritten joke by the playwright George Bernard Shaw has been found in an old cupboard where it had apparently been left for 79 years.

It was found by a researcher examining archives to mark the 90th anniversary of the Wimbledon Labour Party.

Shaw sent the joke to celebrate the opening in 1930 of the Hall at William Morris House in Wimbledon.

It refers to the radical campaigns and meetings that Shaw had addressed nearly 50 years earlier.

The joke, written under a photograph of the Irish dramatist, who died aged 94 in 1950, refers to the writer and socialist campaigner William Morris.

It reads: "William Morris and I preached the gospel of Labour together on many occasions.

"Many respectable persons thought we deserved hanging. I am proud to hang in a hall dedicated to him."

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/england/london/8169297.stm

LUCY PREBBLE’S ‘ENRON’–“CRYSTALLISES THE MOOD OF ITS AGE” ·

(Charles Spencer's review appeared in the Telegraph, July, 23.)

Enron, at Minerva Theatre in Chichester – review

Lucy Prebble's Enron already looks like the play that all the others will have to beat at this year’s theatre awards. Rating: * * * * *

Money, Philip Larkin concluded in one of his most haunting poems “is intensely sad”. In Lucy Prebble’s fantastic firecracker of a new play, brilliantly directed by Rupert Goold, money also proves exciting, sexy, merciless and ultimately tragic.

Prebble tells the story of the Enron, the energy corporation that was named America’s most innovative company six years in succession by Fortune magazine, but which went spectacularly belly-up in 2001, sending waves of shock through the financial world. But Enron’s collapse, originally viewed as a grotesque one-off, now seems a harbinger of the more recent turmoil in our financial institutions, the full devastating impact of which is likely to blight many millions of lives for years and even decades to come.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/culturecritics/charlesspencer/5893217/Enron-at-Minerva-Theatre-in-Chichester—review.html

 

 

BECAUSE WE BELIEVE IN THE FREE EXPRESSION OF THE ARTIST ·

Y8l

(The following message is from Twitter–)

 

RT@SFTHQ URGENT: Dhondup Wangchen's trial any day now. Sign petition for Chinese Govt to release him. Thx to all http://is.gd/1H3z6#fb

 

Petition for the Release of Tibetan Filmmaker Dhondup Wangchen

Petition Sponsor:

Students for a Free Tibet, Inc. wrote and will deliver this petition.

About this Petition:

December 10th is International Human Rights Day http://www.ohchr.org/EN/UDHR/Pag… , a day set aside to recognize the inherent rights of every individual and to take action for those who have been denied their rights. This Human Rights Day, please take action for the release of Tibetan filmmaker, Dhondup … (read more)

December 10th is International Human Rights Day http://www.ohchr.org/EN/UDHR/Pag… , a day set aside to recognize the inherent rights of every individual and to take action for those who have been denied their rights. This Human Rights Day, please take action for the release of Tibetan filmmaker, Dhondup Wangchen http://actionnetwork.org/campaig… , by signing the petition below.

Wangchen has been held without charge by Chinese authorities since March 2008 for doing nothing more than filming Tibetans inside Tibet www.studentsforafreetibet.org/le… as they spoke openly about their views on China, Tibet, the Beijing Olympics, and the Dalai Lama. His footage was smuggled out of Tibet just before his arrest and made into an exceptional documentary film called Leaving Fear Behind www.studentsforafreetibet.org/le… . Dhondup Wangchen is an innocent man and should be immediately released from prison.

Learn more about his case and find out more ways you can help: http://www.studentsforafreetibet.org/le… (show less)

The Desired Outcome of this Petition:

The immediate release of Dhondup Wangchen and all charges dropped against Jigme Gyatso! 

To: Wu Aiying, Chinese Minister of Justice

We petition that…

Dhondup Wangchen has been detained and imprisoned by Chinese authorities for filming interviews with Tibetans. Both Dhondup Wangchen and his cameraman Jigme Gyatso were detained in late March 2008 in Siling in eastern Tibet (Ch: Xining, Qinghai Province). Dhondup Wangchen is reportedly being held without charge at Ershilipu Detention Center in Xining Kachu town (Ch: Linxia, Gansu Province) and Jigme Gyatso was released "temporarily" in October 2008.

Jigme Gyatso was beaten and tortured before being released from detention in October 2008. Dhondup Wangchen and Jigme Gyatso are not guilty of any crime. They simply documented the opinions of a variety of Tibetans, exercising the right to freedom of speech recognized by Premier Wen and enshrined in international law.

Therefore…We, the undersigned, call on you to immediately release Dhondup Wangchen and drop all charges against Jigme Gyatso.

Sincerely,
The Undersigned

 

(Read more)

 

The petition: http://apps.facebook.com/causes/petitions/26?m=e1a7fbf3

 

Freeing Tibet Blog by John and Elizabeth Roberts:

 

http://www.freeingtibet.com/id3.html

KATORI HALL: MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR., PLAY, ‘THE MOUNTAINTOP’, IN LONDON ·

 (Michael Coveney's review appeared in The Independent, July 23, 2009.)

The Mountaintop, Trafalgar Studios, London

Reviewed by Michael Coveney

Like Martin Luther King, black American playwright Katori Hall had a dream, and believed that one day her talent would rise up and live out the true meaning of King's assassination in the knowledge that all men are created equal, even if some men still remain more equal than others.

Her powerful two-hander for King and the housemaid who serves him a cup of coffee (with sympathy and Pall Malls) in the Memphis motel room where he took the assassin's hit the following morning, is a prologue to that departure, a résumé of a stunning political career and a sort of love story . . .

(Read more)

http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/theatre-dance/reviews/the-mountaintop-trafalgar-studios-london-1757394.html

FEINGOLD: ‘THE TEMPERAMENTALS’ AND ‘NEXT FALL’ (REVIEWS) ·

(Continuing to hear about two plays: Michael Feingold's article on 'The Temperamentals' and 'Next Fall'; his reviews appeared June 23rd 2009 in The Village Voice.)

In The Temperamentals and Next Fall, Same-Sex Couples Refight Old Battles

Data informs; memories burn. Taken together, the two equal history, the sense we make of the past. Neither supplies the whole truth. Time rewrites memories; historians assemble data to suit their own ideas. Either way, a telling fact can be omitted. After the world has changed irrevocably, imagining the past becomes a giant challenge, in the service of which the cold data and the burning memories have to work hand in hand. No one would call the process easy: History and memory make an ungainly, awkward, argumentative duo.

Gay history, with more than half of its story hidden in shadow, ranks among the hardest sectors to imagine. Gays born in the last three decades can hardly conceive what being gay before Stonewall involved. Even the word itself was once only part of a private code. In more public circumstances, gay men were "sensitive," "artistic," or, as in the title of Jon Marans's new history play, "temperamental."

The Temperamentals (TBG Theater 2) narrates the few intense years (roughly 1950–53) in which Harry Hay (Thomas Jay Ryan), one of the gay-rights movement's forefathers, launched and ultimately removed himself from the Mattachine Society, a quirky organization that helped pave the way for the movement's explosive expansion after Stonewall. In Marans's recounting, Hay found the inner strength to build such an organization through his love affair with the couturier (then a novice Hollywood costume designer) Rudi Gernreich (Michael Urie). A Viennese émigré, much of whose family had died in the Holocaust, Gernreich combined a European frankness of outlook with a "Continental" charm that, as Marans tells it, could usefully offset Hay's sometimes blunt manner with the risky Society's potential recruits.

(Read more)  

http://www.villagevoice.com/2009-06-24/theater/in-the-temperamentals-and-next-fall-same-sex-couples-refight-old-battles

 

Web site for The Temperamentals: http://thetemperamentals.com/home/

 

Web site for Next Fall: http://www.nakedangels.com/nextfall/